Re: Looking for TLEs from 1979

From: Bill Gray via Seesat-l <seesat-l_at_satobs.org>
Date: Wed, 7 Sep 2016 13:19:51 -0400
Hi Steven,

     Thank you.  I don't have any orbits for objects leaving the solar
system (at least,  none that I computed myself from observations).
As you may have seen,  there are a good number of objects that have
been tracked in heliocentric orbits,  sometimes as they were leaving
the earth/moon system,  some as they went past us for a gravity assist.
The "junk" is usually not all that well tracked;  efforts are made to
ensure they don't hit Mars or Venus and contaminate them with Earthly
organisms,  but that's about it.

     JPL recently came up with trajectories for much Apollo hardware,
including the S-IVB stages and Snoopy :

http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/?horizons_news

     (see news item for 2016 Mar 23).  Most of them wound up in orbits
that are interior to the earth except at apohelion,  so we're not
especially likely to see any of them.  Though the Apollo 12 S-IVB
_did_ come around in 2002,  was briefly mistaken for an asteroid,
and made a few orbits before getting ejected again :

http://www.projectpluto.com/pluto/mpecs/j002e3.htm

-- Bill

On 2016-09-06 00:52, Steven Rappolee wrote:
> I would add objects in solar system escape orbits,
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_artificial_objects_leaving_the_Solar_System
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_artificial_objects_leaving_the_Solar_System>
> And
> http://space.stackexchange.com/questions/1940/where-are-the-upper-stages-for-the-voyager-pioneer-stages/9815#9815
>
>   * Snoopy Apollo 10 ascent stage is most likely in heliocentric orbit
>   * http://astrogatorsguild.com/?p=240
>   *
>
>   * http://space.stackexchange.com/questions/2496/where-were-the-various-apollo-lunar-modules-lms-discarded/13207#13207
>   *
>
> <http:///>
>
> New Horizons Centaur is in solar orbit
>
> http://www.dmuller.net/spaceflight/realtime.php?mission=newhorizons
> <http://www.dmuller.net/spaceflight/realtime.php?mission=newhorizons>
>
>
> Mars observer failed mission is most likely in heliocentric orbit?
>
>
> Thanks
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> photo 	
> *Steven Rappolee*
> Terrestrial & Cislunar Exploration technologies, A post 9/11 Veteran owned concern
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>
> On Tue, Sep 6, 2016 at 7:30 AM, Bill Gray via Seesat-l <seesat-l_at_satobs.org
> <mailto:seesat-l_at_satobs.org>> wrote:
>
>     Hello all,
>
>         As some of you know,  I'm involved with computing orbits for
>     higher-flying (multi-day) artificial satellites.  The higher
>     artsats move at about the same speed as the closer asteroids,
>     which tends to annoy the asteroid surveys.  They will find an
>     artsat,  briefly think they've found a really interesting rock
>     about to come near the earth or hit it,  only to find out it's
>     just a piece of junk.  They find this disappointing,  but there's
>     enough leftover junk in high orbits that it happens every now
>     and then.
>
>         I've computed orbits for these as they are found,  both so
>     that they can be easily identified the next time the surveys
>     stumble across them,  and because there's some hope of one of
>     them hitting the earth or moon.  (So far,  we've had one hit
>     the earth -- WT1190F,  last November,  near Sri Lanka -- and a
>     few close passes by both earth and moon.)  See
>
>     http://www.projectpluto.com/pluto/mpecs/pseudo.htm
>     <http://www.projectpluto.com/pluto/mpecs/pseudo.htm>
>
>         for some examples.
>
>         Anyway.  The SONEAR survey in Brazil picked up an object last
>     night,  to which they have given the designation S510923.  It's
>     in a nearly circular orbit around us,  with a period of about
>     five days.  (Still some fuzziness in this,  which further
>     observations will,  I hope,  cure.)
>
>         It's likely that this is related to the 1976 SOLRAD 11 mission.
>     This put two probes (SOLRAD 11A,  a.k.a. 1976-023C,  and SOLRAD
>     11B,  a.k.a. 1976-023D) and an apogee kick motor (1976-023H)
>     into this sort of orbit.  The folks at the Catalina Sky Survey in
>     Arizona have found SOLRAD 11A,  so it's nicely accounted for and
>     we know S510923 isn't it :
>
>     http://www.projectpluto.com/pluto/mpecs/76023c.htm
>     <http://www.projectpluto.com/pluto/mpecs/76023c.htm>
>
>         SOLRAD 11B kept going until 1979.  We do have a TLE for it
>     from 1977,  and the match to S510923 is quite encouraging.  But
>     if anyone has historical data from 1979 and can provide a TLE
>     for SOLRAD 11B with a more recent epoch,  it might really help
>     figure out what's going on here.
>
>         Observations and an orbit for S510923,  in the Minor Planet
>     Center's formats,  are at
>
>     http://www.projectpluto.com/pluto/mpecs/s510923.htm
>     <http://www.projectpluto.com/pluto/mpecs/s510923.htm>
>
>     Thanks!              -- Bill
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Received on Wed Sep 07 2016 - 12:21:15 UTC

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