Fwd: Wallops Island Notilucent Cloud Experiment

From: David Tiller (dtiller@captechventures.com)
Date: Sun Sep 20 2009 - 00:31:19 UTC

  • Next message: Steve Newcomb: "Wallops Island Notilucent Cloud Experiment"

    I saw the same display in the SE skies from  Elmont, Virginia  
    (37.7122N, 77.5256W). Quite a show! Conditions here were less than  
    perfect - some scattered cumulus clouds as well as a high thin haze.
    
    
    Begin forwarded message:
    
    > Resent-From: SeeSat-L@satobs.org
    > From: <Skywayinc@aol.com>
    > Date: September 19, 2009 8:25:24 PM EDT
    > To: <SeeSat-L@satobs.org>
    > Subject: Wallops Island Notilucent Cloud Experiment
    >
    > This evening, NASA launched a Black Brant Rocket  from Wallops Island,
    > Virginia in order
    > to attempt to create an artificial  noctilucent cloud from a point  
    > roughly
    > 100 miles east
    > of Wallops and at an  altitude of about 170 miles. I had alerted my
    > television audience last
    > night  on News 12 about the launch and posted a blog about it both  
    > at the
    > News 12  site
    > and also at the Hayden Planetarium.
    >
    > I wasn't exactly sure  what we would see from the New York Tri-State  
    > Area,
    > but my wife,
    > Renate and I  were on the lookout, directing our attention toward an  
    > area
    > about 20 to  30
    > degrees above the southern horizon.  Our location was Putnam  
    > Valley,  NY,
    > about 50 miles
    > north of Manhattan.  Skies were perfectly clear with  excellent
    > transparency.
    >
    > The Black Brant Rocket lifted off  from wallops on schedule at 7:46  
    > p.m. EDT
    >
    > Six minutes later at 7:52 p.m.  my wife and I, saw a brilliant  
    > object, of
    > at least
    > magnitude -3 to -4,  displaying a wide, fan-shaped tail . . . like a  
    > comet
    > . . . appearing above
    > the Teapot asterism in Sagittarius.
    >
    > The "tail" was pointing  downward and gradually lengthened to about  
    > 10 or
    > 15-degrees
    > and widened to  about 5 or 10 degrees over a span of about 30 seconds.
    >
    > It was all  so quick!
    >
    > The "head" of the comet (which was the rocket's fourth stage)   
    > rapidly faded
    > out and the "tail" gradually faded over the next minute or so  into  
    > the
    > background of
    > the sky.  I should note that my southern sky  suffers from  
    > considerable
    > light pollution, so
    > the residual glow probably  disappeared more quickly as opposed to a
    > completely dark
    > sky. Even with 7X  binoculars, it was difficult to discern after  
    > about a
    > minute or so.
    >
    > It  was very impressive . . . albeit short-lived.
    > I'm sure many people  along the US East Coast were surprised by this
    > strange sight!
    >
    > -- joe  rao 
    >
    > -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > Subscribe/Unsubscribe info, Frequently Asked Questions, SeeSat-L  
    > archive:
    > http://www.satobs.org/seesat/seesatindex.html
    >
    >
    
    --
    David Tiller
    Sr. Architect/Lead Consultant | CapTech Ventures
    (804) 304-0638 | dtiller@captechventures.com
    
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Subscribe/Unsubscribe info, Frequently Asked Questions, SeeSat-L archive:  
    http://www.satobs.org/seesat/seesatindex.html
    



    This archive was generated by hypermail 2b29 : Sun Sep 20 2009 - 00:32:10 UTC