8539 obs of #25744 and

From: Steve Newcomb (snewcomb@gcnetmail.net)
Date: Thu Sep 30 2004 - 23:15:45 EDT


28054 03 048A   8539 G 20041001002827680 17 25 2248888+244487 38
28054 03 048A   8539 G 20041001002914520 17 25 2310344+433287 18
25744 99 028A   8539 G 20041001004451660 17 25 1858656+323926 38
25744 99 028A   8539 G 20041001004521490 17 25 1905599+355187 38
25744 99 028A   8539 G 20041001004550990 17 25 1913942+390064 38
25744 99 028A   8539 G 20041001004744270 17 25 1951609+503945 38
25744 99 028A   8539 G 20041001004837410 17 25 2015221+553916 67
25744 99 028A   8539 G 20041001004917490 17 25 2036612+590748 67
25744 99 028A   8539 G 20041001005009590 17 25 2109866+630483 67
25744 99 028A   8539 G 20041001005026870 17 25 2122415+641534 38
14180 83 056G   8539 G 20041001010245810 17 25 1934846+292774 38
14180 83 056G   8539 G 20041001010303290 17 25 1957570+382578 38

With the moon only 3 to 9 degree above 0 elevation during obs, below my
local horizon , the conditions were considered good. Using Obsreduce it was
a 10.384 mag star near mu pegasus that I was seeing that #28054 was near for
1st point.

I followed #25744 using an 8" dobs from gamma lyra until I lost it in trees
almost 10 minutes later. I wish I could follow a LEO as easily as I did
#25744 thru a 81 degree elevation. I did follow #14180 up to 84 degree
elevation before I lost it. #25744 was approx 4 times higher at approx to
1900 miles altitude.

Leafs coming down fast, soon will have better view of lower elevations, not
afraid of tracking thru tree branches.

Lat. 39.4707 Lon. -79.3388 Alt. 2753 ft. -4 UTC

What these numbers mean: http://www.satobs.org/position/IODformat.html



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