Re: Iridium max elevation

Ron Lee (ronlee@pcisys.net)
Sun, 31 Aug 1997 15:43:24

Paul, you may well be correct.  However, the max elevation, combined
with the time and direction of travel does define a geometry that
MAY be used to predict future flares (assuming constant satellite
orientation).   Unfortunately, I do not currently have the ability
to define the phase angle for my passes .  That value may be more
important.

Granted the flares occur at other than the max elevation.  Mine were
occuring at about 15-17 degrees elevation on 50 degree  plus passes.

Ron


At 11:02 97/8/31 -0500, you wrote:
>Based on Ron's note to Craig, I do not think the maximum elevation of
>around 56 degrees during my recent August observations of the latest
>Iridiums will be of much help. The flaring occurred at a much lower
>elevation. Hence the geometry is somewhat unique. As long as the passes
>occur at the same geometry for a few days in a row, it is likely that
>once first detected, an alert can be put out for the next day in the
>same geographic region. For SEESATers outside of that TBD region, the
>geometry will likely be very different such that no flaring will be
>visible. This has been confirmed by reports on the net up to now.
>
>Paul
>
>

>