Re: OBSERVATIONS,

Jay Respler (jrespler@injersey.com)
Sun, 8 Sep 1996 03:48:17 -0400 (EDT)

Bjoern asked me:  "Why do you have 08352 in the name field ?" 
That's because I don't know exactly which object this is.

Here are some more observations and part of the original SeeSat comment that
prompted me to look for 08352 and the others.

Bart, do these observations help to id which object this is?
Would someone put this info into Flash?


>***  1996 Aug  31  Sat morning  *** Times are AM EDT ***  2021  532
> H  M  S Tim Azi ElC Dir  Mag Dys F  Hgt Shd  Rng  R A  Dec RCS  Name
> 3 19 49  .0 336 78C  91 20.6   9 7  665  25  677  030 50.2     08352 
>  mag >8  Brightened to 6.8 for few sec, then faded again.    

***  1996 Sept  1  Sun morning  *** Times are AM EDT ***  2020  534
 H  M  S Tim Azi ElC Dir  Mag Dys F  Hgt Shd  Rng  R A  Dec RCS  Name
 2 16  5  .0  71 33  198 22.2        665  39 1055  450 34.3     08352 
                Unseen.  Mag fainter than 8

7/14/96
 H  M  S Tim Azi ElC Dir  Mag Dys F  Hgt Shd  Rng  R A  Dec RCS  Name
 0  40       212 69C      20.6  Unseen.  Mag fainter than 8      08352

6/27/96
 H  M  S Tim Azi ElC Dir  Mag Dys F  Hgt Shd  Rng  R A  Dec RCS  Name
 1  5        337 77C      20.8  Unseen.  Mag fainter than 8      08352

6/26/96
 H  M  S Tim Azi ElC Dir  Mag Dys F  Hgt Shd  Rng  R A  Dec RCS  Name
 0  20       146 64C      20.6                                   08352
 varied about 1 min  from mag 4.4 to 7


***  1996 July  5  Fri evening  *** Times are PM EDT ***  2128  434
 H  M  S Tim Azi ElC Dir  Mag Dys F  Hgt Shd  Rng  R A  Dec RCS  Name
10 54 58  .0 150 80C 271 20.6   8 3  671 355  680 1718 31.1     08197
      mag 6.1   Maybe varied 1/2 mag very slowly      

***  1996 June 27  Thu morning  *** Times are AM EDT ***  2130  429
 H  M  S Tim Azi ElC Dir  Mag Dys F  Hgt Shd  Rng  R A  Dec RCS  Name
 1 25 16  .0 146 63C 272 20.7=6.8    685  95  755 1950 16.4     08197  
 faded slowly. no rapid or large change in brigtness.   
 1 58 58  .0 341 81C  91 20.6=7.6    631 254  638 19 6 48.5     13492 
  maybe varied slightly.  

6/25/96
 H  M  S Tim Azi ElC Dir  Mag                               RCS  Name
 2  11       153 73C      20.5= mag 5.0  Steady for 1 min.       13492


----------------------------
Date: Fri, 05 Jan 1996 18:53:22 +0100 (CET)
From: Bart De Pontieu <BDP@MPE.MPE-GARCHING.MPG.DE>
Subject: NORAD switches 75-82 A and B; 78-18 A and B
archive/latest/1383
The latest Satellite Situation Report contains the following entries :

 8197 75-082A  KIKU 1 (ETS 1)        JPN   105.9  47.0  1102   975   2.1
 8352 75-082B  N-1 R/B               JPN   105.9  47.0  1099   972   1.7
10674 78-018A  UME 2 (ISS-B)         JPN   107.2  69.4  1220   974   1.9
10675 78-018B  N-1 R/B               JPN   107.1  69.4  1216   973   1.7

I think NORAD has switched the payload and the rocket in both cases. 78- 18 B
is really the payload Ume 2, and 75- 82 B is really the payload Kiku 1.

...............

The flash periods reported initially are just too close to the spin rate
to be coincidence. Also, look at what PW reports : F'fF'f
(i.e. a bright specular flash, followed by a fainter specular one, etc...)
That is exactly what you would expect from a set-up with 4 booms, 2 big
ones and 2 small ones.

76- 19 A (Ume 1) is identical in appearance (to 78- 18 B) : specular
flashes with a low and almost constant period.

What about the rockets ?
The late German observer Horst Koehnke observed 76-19 B 20 times between 1976
and 1980. It was steady 5 times, slowly var 13 times and twice seen flashing
(once with 3.48 and once with 2.20). The latter two observations are
possibly occasions where HK was observing 76-19A. Average mag over all these
passes was 7.85.
HK observed 78-18 A 3 times, once steady and twice slowly var.
Average mag was 8.6. And Mike McCants has 'a couple of observations of 78 18A
at intrinsic magnitude 7'.
The N-1 third stage is pretty faint and usually not flashing.

....

That NORAD has possible also switched A and B in the 75- 82 launch is
something new. One of those two objects (75- 82 A and 75- 82 B) is identical
with ETS-I (Engineering Test Satellite) , also called Kiku 1. On p. 981 of
Astronautica Acta, vol. 7, there is an interesting picture of ETS-I. It looks
remarkably similar to Ume 2, i.e. it has four long booms and is covered with
solar cells. The main body is a 26-hedron with about 80 cm diameter. It was
also spin-stabilized, unfortunately I haven't been able to find the nominal
spin rate of this satellite. The list of observations (as reported in the
PPAS of the BWGS) contains several indications that 75- 82 B is the payload
and not the rocket !

.............

Though the case is less strong than for Ume 2, just based on analogy, I
think it's safe to say that NORAD screwed up also with the 75- 82 launch.

It would be interesting to have recent observations of 75- 82 B and 75- 82 A.
If NORAD hasn't switched them by now, I would be willing to bet a lot of
money on it that 75- 82 A will be faint and steady, and 75- 82 B will be
flashing with a flash period well below 10 s.

...............

Who observes 82- 87 A, B and 75- 82 A, B and reports their observations
on SeeSat-L ? 

Cheers,
   Bart De Pontieu 
----------------------------


Jay Respler
--
Join us at Eurosom 2, the Satellite Observers Meeting: Oct.19/20, Belgium
       http://www.rzg.mpg.de/~bdp/eurosom.html
--
  JRespler@InJersey.com   or   Jay.Respler@bytewise.org
     Satellite Tracker * Early Typewriter Collector
                Freehold, New Jersey