Bright new tumbler (for newbies, too)

Walter Nissen (dk058@cleveland.Freenet.Edu)
Thu, 5 Sep 1996 08:14:19 -0400

Jim Varney writes: 
 
> Robert Sheaffer wrote: 
 
> >The elements in your latest (Aug. 30) file predicted that the object, 
> >if it were Cosmos 2322 r, would reappear the following evening, 
> >passing near the zenith at 20:36:40. (Sep. 2 03:36:40 UT) 
> >This is exactly what happened. 
> >So the identity of the tumbler is now known. Once again, the 
> >brightness was greater than predicted, M 2 to 2.5 at its peak. 
 
> I was watching the same object at about the same time.  In PPAS 
> database format, I recorded this observation 
 
> 95- 58 B 96-09-02 03:38      JEV  54.4 0.3  25  2.18 AA 
 
> i.e., 25 flashes in 54.4 sec for a period of 2.18 seconds. 
 
> (To find out more about the Photometric Periods of Artificial 
> Satellites database, see http://www.rzg.mpg.de/~bdp/satintro.html 
> or http://www.physics.ox.ac.uk/sat/satintro.html) 
 
> This a beautiful satellite -- if I had to make up a top ten list, 
> this one would be on it. 
 
Indeed.  Big problem is that there are many in extremely similar orbits. 
But it seems that eddy currents eventually slow their tumbling, so maybe 
you would place the youngest in the Top Ten? 
 
 
Mike McCants writes: 
 
> A new Cosmos launch? 
> 1 24298U 96051B   96248.58277041 -.00000047  00000-0  00000+0 0    14 
> 2 24298  71.0034 165.2062 0006611  81.8328 278.6564 14.13438842    37 
 
Better news than that, this seems to me to bear the signature of the very 
bright Zenit-2's with initial .4-second periods. 
 
Here are the rest, with an even brighter interloper: 
C* 1697 r 
1 16182U 85097  B 96235.03294147  .00000304  00000-0  15627-3 0  5382 
2 16182  70.9958 156.0669 0007367 146.6298 213.5290 14.15256931559930 
C* 1833 r 
1 17590U 87027  B 96235.17511671  .00000396  00000-0  20145-3 0  5461 
2 17590  71.0018 312.1432 0004046 354.7700   5.3386 14.15837677487448 
C* 1844 r 
1 17974U 87041  B 96235.08468576  .00000404  00000-0  20369-3 0  4588 
2 17974  71.0078  78.7561 0012955 123.8823 236.3533 14.16173584479674 
C* 1943 r 
1 19120U 88039  B 96235.02122456 -.00000254  00000-0 -10068-3 0  8640 
2 19120  71.0089 175.0411 0024172 308.9753  50.9209 14.17764979428059 
C* 1980 r 
1 19650U 88102  B 96235.12933471 -.00000321  00000-0 -16567-3 0  5515 
2 19650  70.9951 155.0766 0016336 229.2326 130.7378 14.14899789400035 
C* 2082 r 
1 20625U 90046  B 96235.15393154 -.00000079  00000-0 -16614-4 0   159 
2 20625  70.9947 259.0695 0013255 139.3777 220.8335 14.13707536322762 
C* 2219 r 
1 22220U 92076  B 96235.18181259  .00004568  00000-0  23386-2 0  5456 
2 22220  70.9974 213.8507 0013363 326.6000  33.4281 14.15394674194374 
C* 2227 r 
1 22285U 92093  B 96235.18701117  .00000251  00000-0  13200-3 0  6100 
2 22285  71.0199 312.4287 0005338 198.9724 161.1207 14.13910187187227 
C* 2237 r 
1 22566U 93016  B 96235.04668100 -.00000307  00000-0 -16175-3 0  5283 
2 22566  71.0039 176.9734 0011388 185.0064 175.0941 14.13906521175973 
C* 2263 r 
1 22803U 93059  B 96235.03801482  .00000167  00000-0  84702-4 0  5582 
2 22803  70.9844  63.3081 0015517  78.3145 281.9718 14.15840748151552 
C* 2278 r 
1 23088U 94023  B 96234.91125095  .00000315  00000-0  16638-3 0  2332 
2 23088  70.9973  33.5526 0003094 155.7679 204.3593 14.13804401120373 
Resurs 1-3 r 
1 23343U 94074  B 96235.15680220  .00000037  00000-0  61051-5 0  1910 
2 23343  97.9632 291.6633 0007975   6.5423 353.5875 14.70630044 96517 
C* 2297 r 
1 23405U 94077  B 96234.83200752 -.00000029  00000-0  10000-4 0  2600 
2 23405  70.9792 352.8013 0004527 308.4825  51.5887 14.14210588 89982 
C* 2322 r 
1 23705U 95058  B 96235.15912973  .00000185  00000-0  97029-4 0  1184 
2 23705  71.0256 132.4537 0011584 352.5902   7.5079 14.14164109 41756 
 
Has anyone been following C* 2219 r?  Is that drag real?

Cheers.

Walter Nissen                   dk058@cleveland.freenet.edu