brighter than 1st mag synodic anomaly, PPAS, re: Information re elements

Walter Nissen (dk058@cleveland.Freenet.Edu)
Sat, 31 Aug 1996 10:40:34 -0400

This report gives timings for PPAS and DRAP of a very bright flasher which 
may have displayed a synodic anomaly; also a response for Vince Gardiner. 
 
> From: molczan@fox.nstn.ca (Ted Molczan) 
> Subject: Updated USA 125 r elements 
 
> Here are updated USA 125 rocket elements, courtesy Pierre Neirinck 
> and Russell Eberst: 
 
> USA 125 r        9.8  3.0  0.0  5.0 
> 1 23946U 96038  B 96240.13623740  .00109603  00000-0  20572-3 0    19 
> 2 23946  54.9666 277.5125 0018179 122.1289 238.0476 15.99890142    11 
 
You 3 gentlemen all deserve thanks for updating the elset for this object. 
Ted, if you find it convenient, I would very much appreciate your 
conveying my thanks for this and his other correspondence to Pierre 
Neirinck. 
 
In typical fashion, the older elset would have the observer out looking 
for it after it has already passed by. 
 
 
> From: vgardi@coffs.net.au (vince gardiner) 
> Subject: Information re elements 
 
> As a newcomer to satellite elements, is there some-one out there whom 
> would be willing to educate me on the finer points of the elements. 
 
Perhaps this will be one pertinent bit of an answer, in the context of 
current observations: 
 
Because USA 125 r has a mean motion very close to an integer, its motion 
and the Earth's conspire to position the observer under it every day at 
almost the same time.  I have observed it about 0944 on 960829 and 960830. 
It is a very bright, rapid flasher.  When it made nearly a zenithal pass 
960830, it was a prominent naked-eye magnitude 0, holding its own even 
amongst the brilliant stars of the "winter" sky.  I can't recall the last 
occasion when I timed flashes without optical aid.  Long time ago.  I 
guess it is so low that, while the UTC changes very little, the sidereal 
time is enough different from day to day that its projection against the 
sky changes rapidly.  For my location (your mileage may vary), on 960829 
it was 38 degrees up in the NE.  On 960831 it will be 40 degrees up in the 
SW, on 960901 only 8 degrees up and then it won't be visible after that 
in the morning, instead flipping over to the evening sky under less 
favorable conditions.  Subject to revisions necessitated by subsequent 
changes in its ndot, of course. 
 
If you don't find the Web access 
http://www.physics.ox.ac.uk/sat/satintro.html 
or the search engines (such as http://www.altavista.digital.com) 
satisfactory, you might try egreping the archive for articles about ndot. 
Whether using the search facility or a Web engine, ndot should be a good 
search term.  The archive's search facility is accessed by an e-mail 
message to seesat-l-request@iris01.plasma.mpe-garching.mpg.de with 
Subject: archive and with body, e.g.: 
egrep ndot latest/* 
for a list of all recent messages containing ndot.  The "old" directories 
now extend thru "old5", I believe.  You might try, e.g.: 
egrep ndot latest/* 
egrep ndot old5/* 
egrep ndot old4/* 
etc., etc. 
And then, e.g.: 
get latest/3200 
etc., etc., if message 3200 pops up in your output and seems interesting. 
Once you get some messages, you will probably see other words you might 
want to search for.  I'm pretty sure I've pontificated from my limited 
knowledge base on a number of occasions about ndot/2 and ndotdot/6.  (One 
of the reasons Bart and I founded SeeSat-L was to provide a forum for 
people who know more than we do to correct and amplify our efforts). 
 
ndot is the rate of change in mean motion, the slope and the first 
derivitive of mean motion. 
 
Subtract   6.00s 
 9 45 24.21    9 45 18.21 
 9 45 27.77    9 45 21.77     3.56 
 9 45 29.58    9 45 23.58     1.81 
 9 45 30.92    9 45 24.92     1.34 
 9 45 32.64    9 45 26.64     1.72 
 9 45 34.21    9 45 28.21     1.57 
 9 45 35.83    9 45 29.83     1.62 
 9 45 37.51    9 45 31.51     1.68 
 9 45 39.25    9 45 33.25     1.74 
 9 45 40.97    9 45 34.97     1.72 
 9 45 42.74    9 45 36.74     1.77 
 9 45 44.37    9 45 38.37     1.63 
 9 45 46.23    9 45 40.23     1.86 
 9 45 47.73    9 45 41.73     1.50 
 9 45 49.34    9 45 43.34     1.61 
 9 45 51.15    9 45 45.15     1.81 
 9 45 52.88    9 45 46.88     1.73 
 9 45 54.48    9 45 48.48     1.60 
 9 45 56.25    9 45 50.25     1.77 
 Total   32.04  / 19  =   1.xx 
   96    8  Year and month (2I5) 
   41.3735  -81.8637      256.  lat, long, hgt (3F10.0) 
   29    9   45 18.21  18  Start day,hr,mn,sec  nbr timings 
  0.00  0 
  3.56  2 
  5.37  3 
  6.71  4 
  8.43  5 
 10.00  6 
 11.62  7 
 13.30  8 
 15.04  9 
 16.76 10 
 18.53 11 
 20.16 12 
 22.02 13 
 23.52 14 
 25.13 15 
 26.94 16 
 28.67 17 
 30.27 18 
 32.04 19 
 
Subtract   4.18s 
 9 44 39.21    9 44 35.03 
 9 44 40.70    9 44 36.52     1.49 
 9 44 42.41    9 44 38.23     1.71 
 9 44 44.01    9 44 39.83     1.60 
 9 44 45.74    9 44 41.56     1.73 
 9 44 47.64    9 44 43.46     1.90 
 9 44 49.46    9 44 45.28     1.82 
 9 44 51.03    9 44 46.85     1.57 
 9 44 52.97    9 44 48.79     1.94 
 9 44 54.51    9 44 50.33     1.54 
 9 44 56.25    9 44 52.07     1.74 
 9 44 57.94    9 44 53.76     1.69 
 9 45  0.03    9 44 55.85     2.09   looks like a synodic anomaly 
 9 45  2.05    9 44 57.87     2.02 
 9 45  3.83    9 44 59.65     1.78 
 9 45  5.60    9 45  1.42     1.77 
 9 45  7.13    9 45  2.95     1.53 
 9 45  8.73    9 45  4.55     1.60 
 9 45 10.56    9 45  6.38     1.83 
 9 45 12.27    9 45  8.09     1.71 
 9 45 14.11    9 45  9.93     1.84 
 9 45 15.96    9 45 11.78     1.85 
 9 45 17.48    9 45 13.30     1.52 
 9 45 19.32    9 45 15.14     1.84 
 9 45 20.85    9 45 16.67     1.53 
 9 45 22.62    9 45 18.44     1.77 
 9 45 24.30    9 45 20.12     1.68   watch overflow, 1 timing lost 
 9 45 27.68    9 45 23.50     3.38 
 Total   48.47  / 28  =   1.xx 
   96    8  Year and month (2I5) 
   41.3735  -81.8637      256.  lat, long, hgt (3F10.0) 
   30    9   44 35.03  27  Start day,hr,mn,sec  nbr timings 
  0.00  0 
  1.49  1 
  3.20  2 
  4.80  3 
  6.53  4 
  8.43  5 
 10.25  6 
 11.82  7 
 13.76  8 
 15.30  9 
 17.04 10 
 18.73 11 
 20.82 12 
 22.84 13 
 24.62 14 
 26.39 15 
 27.92 16 
 29.52 17 
 31.35 18 
 33.06 19 
 34.90 20 
 36.75 21 
 38.27 22 
 40.11 23 
 41.64 24 
 43.41 25 
 45.09 26 
 48.47 28 
USA 125 r        9.8  3.0  0.0  5.0 
1 23946U 96038  B 96240.13623740  .00109603  00000-0  20572-3 0    19 
2 23946  54.9666 277.5125 0018179 122.1289 238.0476 15.99890142    11 
 
I didn't do regression for PPAS, but it looks like a little curve-fitting 
might be helpful. 
 
PPAS(beginning): 
Walter I. Nissen, Jr., CDP, dk058@cleveland.freenet.edu, 55 Barrett RD #808, 
Berea, OH 44017-1657, USA, 216-243-4980, -81d 51.823', 41d 22.413', 256m, 7x35 
96- 38 B 96-08-29  9:45:18.2 WN   30.3  .   18  1.68  AA, USA 125 r 
Walter I. Nissen, Jr., CDP, dk058@cleveland.freenet.edu, 55 Barrett RD #808, 
Berea, OH 44017-1657, USA, 216-243-4980, -81d 51.823', 41d 22.413', 256m, 
naked eye 
96- 38 B 96-08-30  9:44:36.5 WN   17.2  .5  10  1.72  AA, USA 125 r 
96- 38 B 96-08-30  9:44:59.6 WN   23.8  .5  14  1.70  AA, USA 125 r 
 
Cheers. 
 
Walter Nissen                   dk058@cleveland.freenet.edu 
 
P.S.  On this mailing list, as opposed to Usenet newsgroups where 
propagation is slow and unreliable, it is not desirable to quote 
extensively from recent messages.  Usually just a couple of lines will do 
fine.  I felt someone might appreciate me quoting the elset, so I did. 
 
--- 
 
Power corrupts.  Absolute power corrupts absolutely.   Lord Acton