Re: Lacrosse-5 flares and disappearance.

From: Gordon Prichard (gprichard@vtown.com.au)
Date: Sat Oct 20 2007 - 08:22:48 EDT

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    Hello everybody,
        I have observed Lacrosse 5, and the other members of this series, on
    many occasions without seeing any flaring or fading. As I observe from
    approx 33S,152E@27m, and I don't recall any southern hemisphere reports
    of flaring or fading, I am wondering if this phenomenon is latitude
    dependent?
             Gordon
             Newcastle, Australia
    
    ---- Original Message ----- 
    From: "Gerhard HOLTKAMP" <grd.holtkamp@t-online.de>
    To: <SeeSat-L@satobs.org>
    Sent: Saturday, October 20, 2007 4:18 AM
    Subject: Re: Lacrosse-5 flares and disappearance.
    
    
    >
    > On 18-OCT-07 Bjorn Gimle wrote (concerning the Lacrosse-5
    disappearances):
    >
    > >I don't quite follow your arguments or conclusions (are there any?)
    here.
    >
    > >During a pass Lacrosse can change its local sun-observer attitude by
    about a
    > >degree/s.
    > >Do you mean that the disapperances occurred at nearly the same
    attitudes?
    > >In that case it would be a local observer event?
    > >Have there been any observations at the same moment from distant
    observers,
    > >to prove that it is a satellite event?
    >
    > What I meant was that if Lacrosse 5 keeps a local attitude (pointing
    with one
    > side always toward the center of the Earth and with another side
    always into
    > the direction of flight) than within this local satellite coordinate
    system
    > the sun would have moved by just 1 degree over the seven minutes of
    > observations starting at 20:12:15 UT, 14-AUG-07. During that time the
    angle
    > between the sun, the satellite and an observer on the ground would of
    course
    > change much more. What is interesting about Lacrosse 5 is that  there
    have
    > been at least two cases where two or more observers at locations
    hundreds of
    > km apart have seen a sudden (within two or three seconds) decrease in
    > brightness of that satellite at exactly the same time (while the
    satellite
    > was still lit by the sun of course). We are still at a loss of how to
    explain
    > this.
    >
    > Gerhard HOLTKAMP
    > Darmstadt, Germany
    >
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