Re: Small parade of three geosynchs

From: Ed Cannon (ecannon@mail.utexas.edu)
Date: Sun Oct 01 2000 - 01:02:16 PDT

  • Next message: Wayne Hughes: "OBS 1 OCT 2000"

    Thanks to everyone who identified Uranus for me!  I didn't even think 
    of that "star" possibly being one of the *major* planets.  I saw it 
    again last night, but it hadn't moved as much as I'd expected.
    
    Saturday evening's session was unfortunately shortened due to me not 
    feeling up to par, but I did get to see the small parade of three 
    geosynchs again.  They went past 23:00, -5 (just south of 11 Aquarii)
    during the period of 1:50 to 2:20 Oct. 1 UTC.  Getting home early, I 
    spent some time doing my best to ID them, and I get the following, in 
    east-to-west order:
    
    25152 98-006A  BRAZILSAT B3  
    24713 97-002A  GE 2          
    *[23132 94-035A  UFO 3]
    18951 88-018A  SPACENET 3R, or maybe 24936 97-050A  GE 3          
    
    *The predictions also put UFO 3 right there, but as the elements are 
    433 days old, I'm inclined to rule it out.
    
    A little while later, I was able to find another one and from about 
    2:39 to 2:52 follow it from about RA 21:20 to 21:35, Dec. -5.  I 
    actually tracked it several more minutes but didn't get the data 
    written down.  This one appears to have been Galaxy XI (26038, 
    99-071A), more than 2.5 hours before shadow entry.  
    
    I run into a problem with these with respect to the flaring geosynch
    phenomenon, based on Rainer Kreskin's message from Sept. 1999:
    
    http://www2.satellite.eu.org/seesat/Sep-1999/0002.html
    
    Both nights now I've seen these objects up to three hours or more 
    before shadow entry, which doesn't seem to fit well with the flaring 
    geosynch hypothesis.  Is it possible that the flaring phenomenon 
    starts that long before they go into the shadow?
    
    The Moon's going to become a problem soon.  I hope the weather here
    holds at least a couple of more nights!
    
    Observing location was 30.314N, 97.866W, 280m.
    
    Ed Cannon - ecannon@mail.utexas.edu - Austin, Texas, USA
    
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