AS SATELLITE OBSERVATION BECOMES MORE POPULAR IN THE '90s

James Husnay Sr. (jhusnay@scsinet.com)
Thu, 15 Oct 1998 08:55:54 -0400

For the list members who wouldn't be aware, our 2 local Syracuse, N.Y.
paper's full page SCIENCE SECTION had an  interesting feature on Monday
Oct. 12th. The 5" X 10" graphic artwork banner blazoned at the top
featured falling meteors and an Iridium flare with the appropriate
caption "FIRE IN THE SKY" within its center.

The almost 90% full page coverage was devoted to "Earth has a date with
a cosmic shooting gallery on Nov.17th." and "Swarm of small satellites
puts on nightly light show."

It was interesting to read what I've only been a small part of for the
last several months. Although syndicated and edited by the associated
press and written by Jennifer Brown I found it was favorable. "What's up
there" gave prominence to the naked and binocular sats, Iridium, Noss,
TiPS, EGP, and Mir with commentary on each.

"The cosmic shooting gallery" by the San Francisco Examiner emphasized
the possibility of the meteors "Sandblasting" satellites and threatening
telecommunications" as the last meteor storm of 1966 found little of
these orbiting craft in space.

Two web sites were noted: satvis and skypub, so I'm sure that after
those living in Central New York who will be lucky enough to see the
predicted flares for the 12th thru 18th and hopefully if we get rid of
the clouds on a couple of clear nights or mornings, then adding too the
possible individuals across the country who see the syndicated message
you'll probably see the seesat list  grow.

So I would like to point out to you, especially those seesater's that
have hung in there from the days of Sputnik and Echo and for you that
calculate this little known science of mathematical configuration so
precisely you should be congratulated for your work you do for the list
members.

With one last thought; lets all hope the Nov 17th Leonids won't be to
harsh on those things that light up our night time sky.