Anyone want a Baker-Nunn satellite camera?

From: Marco Langbroek (marco.langbroek@wanadoo.nl)
Date: Wed Nov 26 2008 - 12:48:40 UTC

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    This was posted on the Minor Planet Mailing List. - Marco
    
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    3. Free Baker-Nunn telescopes
         Posted by: "Patrick Wiggins" paw@wirelessbeehive.com scubaskydivepilot
         Date: Tue Nov 25, 2008 6:58 pm ((PST))
    
    I thought I'd pass this on in case anyone here might be interested.
    
    I spoke to the guy a few minutes ago to make sure the offer is real.
    
    patrick
    
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    Hello-
    
    I am a new member to the group, and represent one of the newest space
    museums; the Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum in McMinnville,
    Oregon.  While the air museum side has been open for a number of years
    (we're home to Howard Hughes' Spruce Goose), we opened our 120,000 sq.
    ft. space museum this last June.  We do not have a planetarium (yet)
    but do have a lot of artifacts from the entire history of the space
    program.
    
    The reason I am posting is to let the group know that Evergreen has a
    pair of Baker-Nunn Satellite Tracking Cameras available to any
    planetarium, space museum or science museum that would like them.  We
    were originally given three of them by a donor in Corvallis, Oregon.
    We restored one and have it on display, but we have two more in an
    off- site storage building. Unfortunately, we are being evicted from
    that building and have to get rid of the cameras quickly.  I'd hate to
    see them scrapped, thus the offer...
    
    For those not familiar, the B-N cameras were 20" Schmitt telescope/
    cameras used to photograph satellites (primarily Soviet), and track
    their orbits in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The Smithsonian
    Astrophysical Observatory used a number of them at locations around
    the world.  They are big, weighing approximately 3.5 tons each.  I
    understand that some enterprising amateur astronomers have modified
    them for comet watching.
    
    The cameras we have are available "as is, where is."  They will need
    to be re-assembled and restored.  We have an excellent set of manuals
    that our restoration team worked from, and we will be happy to provide
    copies.  You will have to move them from McMinnville (approximately 45
    miles southwest of Portland, OR) at your expense, although we do have
    a fork lift to help load them.   I can provide digital pictures; just
    email me at stewart.bailey@sprucegoose.org, and I will be happy to
    send pictures of the cameras and of our restored copy.
    
    Thanks for your consideration!
    
    Sincerely,
    
    Stewart W. Bailey
    Curator
    Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum
    
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