Re: Myself & Observation on Nov 12

From: Björn Gimle (b_gimle@algonet.se)
Date: Mon Nov 14 2005 - 10:45:46 EST

  • Next message: Ed Cannon: "Telstar 401 on Nov 12 and 15, and one that got away"

    At that time, no LEO (=low,fast) satellites could have been sunlit. Within
    wide time (and elevation) limits, I find a few entering (or leaving) shadow
    at a height of 980 km NNW 45 deg, 1460 km SE 48, 2000 km ESE 50 and 1800 km
    E 65 deg.
    Only interesting candidate is NOSS 3-3 A&C culminating at WSW 48 deg
    00:20:30 moving to az.170, EXCEPT they should not flash, and reached 5 deg.
    at 00:28!
    
    Interesting decayers were Cosmos 1658, but it survived 12 hours more,
    and Cosmos 1966 - but it decayed nearly two days earlier.
    A piece of Delta rocket debris may have decayed at the right time, but it
    passed right over you in daylight 18:40 Nov.11 and wouldn't have passed
    above your horizon again before about 07:10 UTC on Nov.12.
    
    /Björn
    
    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Demetrio Rey" <demetrio.rey@gmail.com>
    To: <SeeSat-L@satobs.org>
    Sent: Sunday, November 13, 2005 2:40 PM
    Subject: Myself & Observation on Nov 12
    
    
    > Hi,
    >
    > This is my first post. I am an observer from Venezuela. I am an
    > enthusiast on aeronautics and astronomy, but currently without
    > experience in positional observations, orbital elements, or related
    > software (just entered simple text reports at heavens-above.com).
    >
    > The reason I'm here is the following observation:
    >
    >
    > Name: Unknown
    >
    > Location: Valencia, Venezuela  (10.1810° N, 68.0040° W)
    >
    > Sky Conditions: Good (but few scattered clouds).
    >
    > Date (UTC): Nov, 12, 2005
    >
    > Time (UTC): 00:20:00
    >
    > Time Uncertainity: 300 s
    >
    > Behaviour: Irregular
    >
    > Brightest Mag: -1
    >
    >
    > Comments:
    >
    > The object crossed sky in N-S direction. Observed trayectory (approx):
    > 80 degrees (S) to 5 degrees (S). Speed was unusually fast: I would say
    > about two or three times the apparent speed of the ISS when it crosses
    > the sky at this location.
    >
    > The object did not enter earth shadow or plunged behind the horizon:
    > it stayed at above 5 degress (S) south for 10 seconds and started to
    > get dimmer until disappeared.
    >
    > Very bright. Constant brightness from start of observed trayectory,
    > but it began to experiment constant flashing (0.5 second period,
    > always in same white color), when it went below 10 degress (S). It
    > flashed until it disappeared.
    >
    > It was not an airplane because its amazing speed and lack of jet sound
    > afterwards. I suspect a satellite decay or a meteoroid (however I saw
    > no signs of trail).
    >
    >
    > Does somebody know what was it?
    >
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Demetrio Rey
    >
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