Re: Kupon platform re-entry aftermath

Dale Ireland (direland@drdale.com)
Tue, 18 Nov 1997 15:33:33 -0800

Robert
Well, it came down here (Seattle) at 0510 Nov 15, Friday evening local time,
Saturday afternoon in Japan. So it wasn't the same object. There was apparently
an announcement in Japan of  an impending reentry so I assume it was either a
different object seen in Japan, a meteor, or a "self-fullfilling prophecy" from
some fisherman who heard the prediction. Misinformation about the reentry has
been rampant thanks to a couple of UFO nuts here in Seattle. They picked up,
twisted, and publicized a small mistake by Norad. A Norad spokesman  said the
object would probably fall in the ocean which was a good guess and made a slip
of the lip saying the path was east to west. It was observed here at exactly
the predicted time and path of the Kupon platform (going, of course, west to
east) and if anything came down it was far inland because trail went right over
away to the east of Vancouver. It looked like a typical reentry and I doubt if
any fragments made it down. But the wackos have taken the small inconsistancies
in the norad staement to create a publicity splash as usual.

Dale

Robert Knight wrote:

> Has anyone integrated the following AP report from Japan with the
> Canadian/Northwestern sightings of the SL-12 re-entry?  Apparently,
> there must have been quite an extensive trail...
>
> --Robert Knight (73N57 40N43)
>
> =============================================================
>
> Suspected satellite launcher fragment falls in southern Japan
> Associated Press, 11/13/97 13:03 EST
>
> TOKYO (AP) - Fishermen in southern Japan saw a shining object fall into
> the ocean Thursday night, and Japanese coast guard officials said they
> believe it was a fragment from a Russian satellite launcher.
>     The fishermen were on a boat in the Pacific Ocean about 40 miles
> east of Japan's southwestern island of Tanegashima only minutes before a
> fragment was expected to fall in northern Japan, said an official with
> the Maritime Safety Agency.
>     Earlier Thursday, the Defense Agency was notified by U.S. forces in
> Japan that a fragment of a Russian SL-12 satellite launcher would fall
> near Kushiro, on Japan's northern island of Hokkaido, 530 miles
> northeast of Tokyo.
>     The Maritime Safety Agency said it planned to send a plane Friday to
> investigate the object.
>
> ==========================================================
>      +-----+
>      | | | |        "The operating system IS the virus!"
>      | | | |         ----------------------------------
>      | | | |                    Robert Knight
>      | | | |
>      +-----+                  rknight@escape.com
>   WINDOW$ 95/98        http://www.escape.com/~rknight/
> ==========================================================
>
> Craig Cholar wrote:
> >
> > Something I did find intriguing were the multiple claims that NORAD said
> > the object crashed into the Pacific.  That does seem to contradict many
> > eyewitnesses who saw the debris trail go inland.  I suppose it's possible
> > the lighter debris continued on, with the heavier pieces falling into the
> > Pacific.  Is there an official NORAD announcement on the net?  I poked
> > around http://www.spacecom.af.mil/norad and didn't find one.
> >



--
Dale Ireland 47.7N 122.7W
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