Re: Are iridium flares less common in some areas?

From: Bjorn Gimle \(TietoEnator\) (bjorn.gimle@tietotech.se)
Date: Tue May 14 2002 - 05:09:28 EDT


Subject: Re: Are iridium flares less common in some areas?


> Yes, but also the length of the latitude circle.

Clarification: In the 9.3 minutes between two (operational) Iridiums, the
Earth rotates 255 km at the equator, 130 km at my latitude, and 25 km at
84.5 degrees latitude. So, even if the tracks were N-S, they would have 10x
higher chance of bright flares.

Also the shorter twilight at the equator reduces the chance of night-time
passes being sunlit.

-- bjorn.gimle@tietotech.se (office)                         --
-- b_gimle@algonet.se (home)  http://www.algonet.se/~b_gimle --
-- COSPAR 5919, MALMA,    59.2576 N, 18.6172 E, 23 m         --
-- COSPAR 5918, HAMMARBY, 59.2985 N, 18.1045 E, 44 m         --

>
> ----- Original Message -----
> > > equator will see fewer flares because there will be fewer visible
> > > passes per
> > > unit area.  For Iridium flares you would be best positioned very
> > > near the
> > > poles.  If you worked at the South Pole Station you could see flares
> > > 24 hours
> > > a day for months at a time.
> >
> > Is this a function of the slope of the satellite's path over an
observing
> > site?
> >
>
>
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