Re:Galaxy 4

Michael Comiskey (grc@spica.usno.navy.mil)
Wed, 20 May 98 16:05:09 -0500

According to the reports I've seen, the failure stems from the demise of a
microprocessor chip in the attitude control system.  There was a slightly
elevated solar K-index yesterday, but for the most part the geomagnetic field
was quiet.  While a meteoroid could conceivably cause such a failure, there does
not appear to be a sudden change in the satellite's attitude as would be
expected from an impact.  Looks like it just fried its li'l ol' brain...

Geoff

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| Geoff Chester      grc@spica.usno.navy.mil       Public  Affairs Office |
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____________________Reply Separator____________________
Subject:    Galaxy 4 
Author: <SeeSat-L@cds.plasma.mpe-garching.mpg.de>
Date:       20-May-98 8:56 PM

Hi all

The TV people are not the only ones who are having problems.
See:

http://www.cnn.com/TECH/space/9805/20/satellite.outage.ap/index.html

http://satellite.miningco.com/library/daily/blgalaxy4.htm

for stories about pager user having a hard time as well.
Does anyone know what would cause such a failure? 
Would a meteoroid strike cause such a problem?
Michael Comiskey, at Home in Belfast
mjc@number8.dnet.co.uk          (preferred)   
mjc@number8.demon.co.uk         (home)       
michael.comiskey.um@nics.gov.uk (work)