Re: Observability of solar satellite transits

jean monseur (jmonseur@mail.cpod.fr)
Fri, 9 May 1997 00:34:21 +0200

At 11:04 07/05/1997 -0400, you wrote:

>For TIPS this condition is met. In the case of TIPS there is an additional
>effect: the human brain recognises LINEAR structures much better than
>pointlike ones. 

I heard that TiPS  travelling through the ionosphere is induced to generate
electromagnetic waves in the visible field  ??


>>Please, explain the role of filters.<
>
>If you mean solar filters: their role is to attenuate the light intensity of
>the sun so that the eye is not completely blindfolded. The satellite, which
>is anyway dark, can only get darker.

In my opinion this seems only partially convincing and does not lead into the
heart of the question.

Do solar filters only attenuate the light intensity, or do they work as
wavelenghts selectors ?
Is there a relation between visibility and wavelenght ?
When calculating the minimum surface of the would-be-seen satellite, will 
you input the wavelenght in the formula ?
Can you estimate or calculate the diffraction of the light which could,
to some extend, light up the dark side of the satellite ? 
Is really Io transit of  Jupiter  comparable to Mir transit of the sun ?
Since the most important diffraction in space and in the atmosphere is that 
of the blue and u.v. wavelenghts , would you be  surprised if you were
told that the main role of solar filters is to stop blue and u.v. ?

To be continued...
jmonseur@mail.cpod.fr  
Lat +49d 05'    Long 359d 37' E