Re: Re:Geo sat leading Intelsat 707=96107

From: John Locker (john@satcom.freeserve.co.uk)
Date: Tue Mar 11 2008 - 08:30:21 UTC

  • Next message: Alberto Rango: "4542 PPAS 03 - 04 - 09 MAR 2008."

    Give me the sky and I'll give you the pictures Greg :O)))
    
    We have had precious few evenings where the visibility below 30 ( max 
    elevation of the arc here )  degrees has been useable .
    Noticeable has been a thick haze at these levels , even though higher 
    elevations have on the odd evening provided good seeing.
    
    Perhaps the next few days of storms will clear the low level 
    mists/haze/pollution for a short time giving me chance to take a look in the 
    ten to forty  degrees west area.
    
    John
    
    
    ----- Original Message ----- 
    From: "Greg Roberts" <grr@telkomsa.net>
    To: <SeeSat-D@satobs.org>
    Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2008 7:53 AM
    Subject: Re:Geo sat leading Intelsat 707=96107
    
    
    > Kevin Fetter wrote:
    >
    >>A faint geo sat leading Intelsat 707 ( 23816 ) is close to the predicted 
    >>position of 96107.
    >>96107
    >>1 96107U          08070.93540654 0.00000000  00000-0  00000-0 0    07
    >>2 96107   0.2326  93.3523 0000100 247.2853 112.7220  1.00270000    00
    >>At 2:57 UTC ( Mar 11 ) it's around Mag 10 range.
    >>Around 2:59:30 UTC give are take a few seconds, it passed close to TYC 
    >>4920 1103 located around
    >>J2000
    >>Right ascension: 10h55m57.0883s
    >>Declination: -06 37' 40.305"
    >>Kevin
    >
    > Hi Kevin
    >
    > There are a LOT of other interesting satellites in the ESA 96*** objects 
    > :-))
    >
    > The one you saw was DSCS 3-14  03040A #27875 ( = 96107 = UI107).
    >
    > There is a chronic shortage of observers outside of the area that Peter
    > Wakelin (UK) and myself ( South Africa ) can cover - in fact we only have
    > coverage over about 90% of the Clarke belt so we would like to encourage
    > observers in the western hemisphere and Australasia to give more attention
    > to geostationaries and near geostationary satellites.
    >
    > Some can be as bright as magnitude +8, whilst most of the objects in the
    > ESA#10 catalog are brighter than magnitude +13. (96*** or UI*** objects
    > - remove the 96 or UI and its the same satellite) .Some flash with periods
    > ranging from a second to minutes whilst others are steady - an effort is 
    > being
    > made to determine which are easy targets but its only by means of 
    > observations
    > that this can be achieved.
    >
    > Many of these objects are still operational spacecraft, even if drifting 
    > along
    > the Clarke belt - this has been determined from radio observations. 
    > Fortunately
    > we have good radio coverage of the Clarke belt but none over Australasia 
    > but
    > the appeal for radio observers belongs in another newsgroup :-))
    >
    > Okay off my soap-box now :-))
    > Cheers
    > Greg
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