Obs 14 March 2005

From: Greg Roberts (grr@iafrica.com)
Date: Wed Mar 16 2005 - 04:36:51 EST

  • Next message: Ted Molczan: "TJM obs of 2005 Mar 16 UTC"

    Observations 14 March 2005  Part 1
    ---------------------------------
    Cosatrak 1 (Computerised satellite Tracking System).
    MINTRON low light level CCD surveillance camera (0.005 lux typical
    in non integration mode) and 0.00005 lux in STARLIGHT mode with 128
    frame integration. Due to bright sky it is not worthwhile integrating
    more than 48 frames which is equivalent to an exposure of 0.96 seconds.
    
    Lens used this session was a large bulky/heavy lens that came out of
    a photo-copier machine !   It produced very nice images and I had high
    hopes for it but unfortunately my 200mm focal length lens gives a slightly
    bigger field of view and about half a magnitude extra gain so not much
    sense in pursuing the use of this lens. The field of view was 1.49 x 1.16
    degrees and could see stars down to about magnitude +11.5.
    
    I have one more item to check out and that is a 6 inch f/4.5 homemade
    reflector - I suspect performance will be similar to the 5 inch f/5
    refractor but will the reflector produce smaller/sharper images since its
    not sensitive to infra-red as the lenses are? .... the mirror however
    needs re-aluminising.
    
    If I got real enthuisiastic I could try a 11.5 inch f/5 mirror I have but
    the field of view will be far too small for satellite tracking.The same
    applies to my 12.5inch f/8 mirror.
    
    Data recorded on DVD R/W disks - will be kept for 1 month and then
    re-used - just in case any queries as Im always making mistakes!
    
    Site 0433 : Longitude 18.51294 deg East, Latitude  33.94058 deg S,
    Elevation 10 metres - situated in Pinelands (Cape Town), South Africa
    
    Correction for 7th March 2005:
    -------------------------------------
    This is incorrect:
    90013 03 564A   0433 G 20050307184420100 17 15 1050182+053703 39
    It should read
    90031 05 564A   0433 G 20050307184420100 17 15 1050182+053703 39
    
    
    Observations 14 March:
    ----------------------------
    90017 03 780A   0433 G 20050314180059000 17 15 0555538+055739 39
    90017 03 780A   0433 G 20050314180148500 17 15 0556484+055821 39
    90017 03 780A   0433 G 20050314181702400 17 15 0612044+060408 39  +070 05
    27168 02 001A   0433 G 20050314180935000 17 15 0547039+071556 39
    90005 99 804A   0433 G 20050314183124000 17 15 0915152+120424 39
    90005 99 804A   0433 G 20050314183214000 17 15 0916003+120303 39
    23712 95 060A   0433 G 20050314204028000 17 15 0846368+091651 39
    90031 05 564A   0433 G 20050314211344000 17 15 1348329+051928 39
    23712 95 060A   0433 G 20050314213146000 17 15 0938058+095131 39
    90020 04 539A   0433 G 20050314190949500 17 15 0813060+292840 39
    90020 04 539A   0433 G 20050314191221200 17 15 0819329+271842 39
    90020 04 539A   0433 G 20050314193528400 17 15 1051494-210136 39
    90020 04 539A   0433 G 20050314194026000 17 15 1259350-410655 39
    90025 04 800A   0433 G 20050314203204000 17 15 0920071+354210 39
    90025 04 800A   0433 G 20050314203423200 17 15 0928574+333426 39
    90025 04 800A   0433 G 20050314203557200 17 15 0935447+315655 39
    
    Commercial geostationaries:
    --------------------------------
    EUTELSAT W5
    27554 02 051A   0433 G 20050314211344000 17 15 1349563+051351 39
    ANIK E1
    21726 91 067A   0433 G 20050314205612000 17 15 1029415+071249 39
    TELCOM 2A
    21813 91 084A   0433 G 20050314184958000 17 15 0622559+061926 39
    
    Strays:
    --------
    SL-3 R/B
    14208 83 075B   0433 G 20050314180323500 17 15 0839523+121148 39  +025 05
    METEOR 2-11
    15099 84 072A   0433 G 20050314183625000 17 15 0526357+072006 39  +055 05
    SL-6 R/B(2) orbit 732 x 38796km,i=64.65, p=701.1m,observed at 8000 km range
    27412 02 017D   0433 G 20050314201802000 17 15 0744560+125208 39  +025 05
    
    Notes:
    --------
    (1) First two positions for 90017 are of very faint regular flashing.
        Suspect its 90017 as no other geostationaries in area at time.
        When I checked it about 15 minutes later was flashing to about mag
        +7 every 2.5 seconds approximately.
    (2) Milstar 2 again very faint at start of night. Kevin is correct- I
        should have said "flares" instead of flashing in my previous report.
    (3) Think I have recovered 90005 - visible in real time moving very slowly.
    (4) 90020 an easy object at most ranges as it regularly flashes so is
        easy to find. 90025 appeared steady over the period I followed it.
    
    Cheers
    Greg
    
    
    
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