Re: IUE, etc.

Steve Walter (sowalter@erols.com)
Wed, 25 Mar 1998 19:34:15 -0500

I will admit to NOT being up on lots of things, lately, including observing
capabilities -- but I wonder about your IUE observations.

My understanding from the guys who tried moving it out of its operational
orbit after the funding ceased, was that it self destructed and (probably)
broke up into several pieces.  [It's exact status is conjecture.]

I know that 15 years or so ago when several of my cohorts tried to
photograph it, while IUE was in its entirety, it was a difficult task.  Are
the published orbital elements for the remaining pieces -- and today's
optics -- so superior?

'Just curious ...  Steve Walter
	[ Glenn Dale, Maryland (outside GSFC)]
	[~-76d 49.6m Longitude   x   +39d 01.3m Latitude]






> Here's some observations of high-flying satellites, preceded with the
>Highfly predictions:
>
	...
>
> 10637 IUE        78 12A  7.5 M 3.5 ELDY 21 M2   -2
>  4 50   80 109 11.1  18691  10 47.1  35.6  18745
>  5 20   75 102 11.1  18841  11 39.8  35.2  18951
> The neatest catch of the night - IUE = International Ultraviolet
>Explorer.  Observed from 0450-0516 with the 12-inch at 105x.  Mag.
>13.5, flashing to mag. 11 or 11.5 with an interesting cycle: 3 flashes
>at approximately 1.1 second intervals, then skip the 4th flash, then 3
>more flashes, etc.  I timed 14 of these cycles (flash-flash-flash-no
>flash) in 60 sec., yielding a 4.3 second cycle, or a period of 1.1
>seconds between individual flashes (2.2 seconds when it skips the
>flash).  I would imagine that this object is four-sided with low
>reflectivity on one side for some reason, and is rotating once every
>4.3 seconds.
>
> Cheers, Rich Keen
> Coal Creek