RE: Piece of Mir found in Massachusetts

From: Ted Molczan (ssl3molcz@rogers.com)
Date: Sun Jun 16 2013 - 16:21:08 UTC

  • Next message: Art Glick: "Re: Piece of Mir found in Massachusetts"

    Here is a bit more comprehensive article:
    
    http://www.newburyportnews.com/local/x2113330113/Amesburys-space-junk
    
    <<< A year went by, and eventually Green assumed the strange rock was gone for good, until a couple of weeks ago when he
    received a package in the mail from NASA containing his rock, a plaque and a letter from NASA Analysis Engineer George
    Leussis confirming that the rock had indeed fallen from space.
    
    "It's funny that the week I got it back, I happened to wake up and think to myself 'I wonder what happened to my rock, I
    don't think I'm ever going to see it again,'" Green said. "And then it came back."
    
    The letter confirmed that while the rock originated on Earth, it had definitely been subjected to a fall from low Earth
    orbit, which was the reason for the rock's green color and strange properties.
    
    "The material shows a composition similar to that used as ballast by the soviet space program starting in the mid
    1980s," Leussis wrote. "This places its most likely origin as Mir, or one of the Progress-M class Russian resupply
    vehicles, that had undergone a TPS failure." >>>
    
    I do not intend to pursue this further, but perhaps the next step in the effort to resolve reasonable doubt would be to
    request details of the analysis attributed to NASA, and decide whether it is sufficient to answer the following
    questions:
    
    Are the object's material properties sufficiently unique to connect them to a part of Mir or its contents, or any of the
    spacecraft that visited it?
    
    If the object is believed to have originated on an object or class of object for which an orbital history exists, then
    does the location of its discovery on Earth correlate with any of their re-entry trajectories? Make reasonable allowance
    for known forces that could have moved the object from point of impact to the location of the find.
    
    Ted Molczan
    
    
    _______________________________________________
    Seesat-l mailing list
    http://mailman.satobs.org/mailman/listinfo/seesat-l
    



    This archive was generated by hypermail 2b29 : Sun Jun 16 2013 - 16:22:50 UTC