Fw: (high res) Soyuz rocket tumbling observation _update 1

From: Ralf Vandebergh (ralf.vandebergh@home.nl)
Date: Thu Jun 24 2010 - 09:11:33 UTC

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    Here is a good factory-view on the stage you see in the video.
    (the separate part): 
    http://tinyurl.com/32w8ynf
    
    Ralf
      (high res) Soyuz rocket tumbling observation _update 1________________________________________________________
    
      Here is the best presentation of the animation I could get.
      It's one of my most interesting observations so far. I really was
      amazed to see how dynamic the rocket stage appeared over the
      short time in the frames. The best comparison and proof were
      the frames of the Soyuz spacecraft itself I captured a few 
      minutes later. The stabilized Soyuz appeared in the frames
      very neat at one position.
    
      http://tinyurl.com/38g27c4
    
      Ralf 
    
    
    
      On June 17, one day after launch of the Soyuz TMA-19 with the expedition 24
      crew on its way to the ISS, the 3rd stage of its rocket and the Soyuz itself
      passed over the Netherlands. The apparant speed of the 2 objects was at that
      time much higher then the ISS, due to its still lower orbit.
    
      The rocket passed about 15 minutes before the Soyuz and was in a low orbit
      of below 200km. When I inspected the frames of the rocket one obvious thing
      I saw was a different position of the rocket over the short time during
      its pass. 
    
      To be sure, this is not caused by any movement artefacts due to
      the highspeed, I only used frames which show a clear elongated shape of the
      rocket in the not-move direction. 
    
      About halfway the animation, we seem to look even towards the short
      axis (long axis pointed to Earth)
    
      Usually, different forces cause a rocket to tumbling after it separates
      and is not longer stabilized and can free rotated in Earth orbit.
      Beside magnetic field forces, especially with rockets below 200km altitude
      like this one, they are influenced heavily by aerodynamic forces.
    
      Interesting page about this matter:
      http://www.satobs.org/tumble/rottheory.html
    
    
      Best wishes,
      Ralf
      http://ralfvandebergh.startje.be/vieuw.php?qid=328303
    
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