Re: ISS in daylight!!!

From: John Locker (john@satcom.freeserve.co.uk)
Date: Tue Jun 10 2008 - 08:48:16 UTC

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    I'd be interested to know what the relationship is between the elevation of 
    the pass and the sun separation and angle for true daylight passes.
    
    My own studies involve telescopic viewing    , the latest attempt was with 
    the sun down to 17 degs above the horizon and whilst the station was easy to 
    spot on the recording , it was not visible , either naked eye or through the 
    8 x 50 viewfinder.
    
    http://mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/satcom_transits/daylight.html
    
    Unfortunately the best elevation I can expect is 61 degs.
    I suspect that with passes of 70 degs or higher there's a much better chance 
    of seeing something naked eye shortly before sunset.
    
    Whether  ISS will ever become a true naked eye ( ie seen in clear sky 
    conditions at any time of day ) object I'm still not sure.
    
    John
    
    
    
    
    
    ----- Original Message ----- 
    From: <Skywayinc@aol.com>
    To: <seesat-l@satobs.org>
    Sent: Tuesday, June 10, 2008 1:44 AM
    Subject: ISS in daylight!!!
    
    
    >
    > Just saw the ISS from Yonkers, just  outside of our News 12 studios just
    > prior to sunset, as an E-mail alert I had  sent out to several indivials 
    > and two
    > local (NY) astronomy clubs on Sunday  night.  Have also received 
    > confirmation
    > of sightings from two other  observers (see below).
    >
    > I didn't see it until it passed almost overhead .  . . then saw it ramp-up 
    > in
    > brightness to perhaps magnitude -6 or brighter  against the hazy/steely 
    > blue
    > sky.  Also used 7 X 35 binoculars.
    >
    > So  yes . . . you CAN see the ISS in the daytime!!!
    >
    > -- joe  r.
    >
    > ----------------------------------------------------------
    > I saw it  from Katonah, NY, picking it with the naked eye when it flared 
    > (-6?
    > -7?) shortly  after it passed overhead. I watch lots of ISS passes, and 
    > this
    > is the best flare  I've seen. Are they becoming more common?
    >
    > Thanks!!!
    > Brian  Summers
    >
    > ----------------------------------------------------
    >
    > Dear  Joe,
    >
    > From my home in Lindenhurst, using my eyes alone, I looked carefully  from
    > 8:17 PM, and finally acquired the ISS at 8:21:10 PM EDT (checked with 
    > watch
    > checked with WWV) and watched it drift slowly in a hazy but cloudless blue 
    > sky.
    > The object brightened gradually, almost flaring at 8:21:21.  It  then 
    > dimmed
    > and I was able to hold it visually until I lost it at  8:22:17.
    >
    > (Incidentally, checking the positions against Starry Night with  daylight
    > turned off helped greatly in predicting where to look- you had gotten  the
    > directions wrong in your e-mail, but the altitudes and azimuths were 
    > right.)
    >
    > Sam Storch
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
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    >
    > 
    
    
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