Re: tumbling satellites

From: Leo Barhorst (leobarhorst@zonnet.nl)
Date: Thu Jun 01 2000 - 04:09:22 PDT

  • Next message: Eberst: "MAY30-31.OBS"

    Tony Bersesford wrote;
    >The other obvious flasher 93 20J
    
    This must be 92- 30 J
    
    The flashers seen by Penny Fisher and Aaron Brown:
    If they were flashing with a period of about 2 seconds they cann't have been
    92- 30 J that is now at 5.83 sec
    99- 39 B now at 3.83 sec
    00-   6 B now at just over 1 sec (1.03)
    
    Other candidates , based on a period of about 2 seconds:
    99- 22 C was 2.02 sec on May 5th
    76- 19 A that is at 2.34 sec
    
    But checking this for Aarons coordinates, the sats were not visible May
    27(in UT).
    I don't have Penny's coordinates.
    This are recent TLE's for both objects:
    UME 1 (ISS 1)
    1 08709U 76019A   00146.96415740 +.00000030 +00000-0 +92368-4 0 01597
    2 08709 069.6726 157.2923 0010370 136.7591 223.4337 13.70679458212508
    SL-08 R/B
    1 25723U 99022C   00146.94696411 +.00004474 +00000-0 +38861-3 0 01857
    2 25723 048.4522 007.5958 0036373 323.3424 036.5012 14.98189444058869
    
    Of course UME 1 (ISS 1) has nothing to do with ISS (98- 67 A) the
    International
    Space Station. For UME it was the acronym for: Ionosphere Sounding
    Satellite,
    launched by Japan on a N-1 rocket.
    Also its sistercraft, 78-18 B, is flashing nicely at 3.3 sec.
    
    Greetings and clear, dark skies
    Leo Barhorst
    52.767 N  5.09 E  2 m ASL
    
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