Re: STS-77 Reentry Observed (!)

Philip Chien (kc4yer@amsat.org)
Mon, 3 Jun 1996 16:16:06 -0400

Jim Varney <jvarney@mail2.quiknet.com> notes:
>
>NASA's future STS mission page at
>
>http://www.osf.hq.nasa.gov/shuttle/futsts.html
>
>shows no 39 deg missions from STS-79 on out to STS-113 in May, 2001.


As a normal rule a 39 degree mission doesn't become a 39 degree mission
until late in the process.  STS-40, STS-62, STS-73, and STS-77 were all
planned as 28.5 degree missions until the decision was made to change the
inclination to optimize lighting conditions, landing times, crew schedules,
etc.

The only time a mission was planned - from the start - as a 39 degree
mission was the STS-58 Spacelab Life Sciences-2 mission because it was a
follow-up to the STS-40 SLS-1 mission which flew as a 39 degree flight.

>If you can divulge, got any idea
>how far behind the ISS sked is?

at this point Space Station's first flights are on schedule.  But we're
still well over a year away from First Element Launch.  There are _many_
showstopers ahead and milestones, so it's quite conceivable that something
will happen which will result in a delay to space station's schedule.

A couple of payloads have extended storage authorized, just in case there's
enough money to fly them again, or the manifest opens up.  (euphemism for
space station slip).


Philip Chien, Earth News - space writer and consultant  PCHIEN@IDS.NET
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