re: NOAA-13 question (and other things)

From: Ed Cannon (edcannonsat@yahoo.com)
Date: Sat Jul 17 2010 - 08:38:51 UTC

  • Next message: Leo Barhorst: "PPAS input program"

    Here's a message in which I reported on NOAA
    13 (93-050A, 22739) back in August 2004:
    
    http://www.satobs.org/seesat/Aug-2004/0174.html
    
    Below are my times for NOAA 13 for 15 July UTC.
    Note that by #57 it was behaving such that I
    could only reliably see two of the four flashes,
    and by the end only two were visible at all.  
    None of the flashes was very bright on this 
    pass.
    
    48   ____     2:19:22.34 (4:59:22.34 UTC)
    49   1.78          24.12
    50   1.75          25.87
    51   1.56          27.43
    52   1.72          29.15
    53   1.93          31.08  
    54   1.60          32.68
    55   1.59          34.27
    56   1.68          35.95
    57   5.16          41.11  
    58   1.87          42.98
    59   4.98          47.96
    60   1.79          49.75
    61   5.21          54.96
    62   1.69          56.65
    63   4.97     2:20:01.62
    64   1.76           3.38
    65   5.13           8.51
    66   1.78          10.29
    67   5.03          15.32
    68   1.76          17.08
    69   5.13          22.21
    70   1.78          23.99
    71   5.04          29.03
    72   1.88          30.91
    73   4.96          35.87
    74   1.75          37.62
    75   5.13          42.75
    76   1.71          44.46  (5:00:44.46 UTC)
    
    The night before, it was doing more of a
    flash-flash-flash-miss pattern, but I lost
    my times for that one (mistaken button 
    click on the stopwatch).  
    
    So much time has elapsed and I've changed
    computers enough that I can't remember how
    I used to do PPAS reports, except that I 
    used some neat little software program to 
    enter them.
    
    Regarding other neat flashers, for any who
    may not yet be aware, if you like EGP and
    USA 32 and USA 81, then you should have a
    look at Ume 1 (08709, 76-019A) and Ume 2
    (10675, 78-018B [by the way Spacetrack's
    elements say B is the rocket and A is the
    payload]), if you have not already.  They 
    both sometimes (always?) exhibit spans of 
    regular flashes alternating with very 
    rapid, chaotic flashing, sometimes bright 
    enough to be seen without magnification.  
    
    Regarding USA 186 -- no wonder Mike and I
    didn't see it Thursday evening!  I thought
    it was just too faint for me with my 8x42
    binocular, but now we know why Mike didn't 
    see it -- it wasn't there.
    
    One more thing.  Totally by accident I
    stumbled upon a Brazilian satellite 
    tracking website which may be of interest
    to some SeeSat-L members.  If you click 
    the US flag "Track Satellites Worldwide" 
    at the upper left, it's almost all in 
    English, but other parts of it are in 
    Portuguese.  It uses a database of 156 
    objects, which may be the visual.txt file 
    that's hosted on the Celestrak site.  By
    default it tracks ISS.  You can adjust it
    to your location.
    
    http://www.satview.com.br/
    
    It has an explanation of the illumination
    of passes that I didn't quite follow.  It
    says:  "SHA - The satellite is in the Earth 
    shadow (or terminator), the line between 
    day and night."  But in a different output
    it also has "SIM" or "NOT" to indicate 
    "yes" or "no" to the satellite being 
    illuminated by the Sun.  It gives passes 
    in shadow because it considers radio 
    observation as well as visual.  
    
    Ed Cannon - Austin, Texas, USA
    
    
    
          
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