RE: STS-114 Launch Window/Plane

From: tony dinkel (tonydinkel47@hotmail.com)
Date: Mon Jul 11 2005 - 11:53:21 EDT

  • Next message: Walter Nissen: "re: STS-114 TLE's"

    This may be way too elementary for most of you but from my understanding of 
    the STS ISS orbit insertion trajectory, which is minimal, they do not burn 
    out of plane.  They make every effort to align the launch azimuth so they 
    end up in the same inclination as ISS.  Out of plane manuvers are very fuel 
    inefficient for STS and they need to conserve OMS prop for on orbit and 
    deorbit.
    
    
    
    >From: Jeff Umbarger <jumbarger2000@yahoo.com>
    >To: seesat-l@satobs.org
    >Subject: STS-114 Launch Window/Plane
    >Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2005 13:57:33 -0700 (PDT)
    >
    >Hey All,
    >      Please check my reasoning: I've created a
    >"Heavens-Above" bookmark/favorite for Kennedy Space
    >Center - Launch Pad 39A:
    >
    >http://www.heavens-above.com/main.asp?lat=28.60768&lng=-80.60416&alt=0&loc=KSC+39A&TZ=EST
    >
    >Then I went to the above URL and clicked on the "Radio
    >amateur satellites" passes. I chose this because I
    >wanted to see *all* overflights of the ISS over KSC,
    >not just the visible ones.
    >      I've noticed that "bracketing" the launch time of
    >3:51pm EDT on July 13 is that the ISS overflies KSC at
    >3:11pm EDT on July 13 at 20 degrees elevation in the
    >southeast and then overflies KSC at 4:46pm EDT on July
    >13 at 18 degrees elevation in the northwest:
    >
    >http://www.heavens-above.com/amateursats.asp?lat=28.60768&lng=-80.60416&alt=0&loc=KSC+39A&TZ=EST&Date=38546.7708564816
    >
    >      The launch time is not in the exact middle of
    >bracketing times above, 3:11pm and 4:46pm. If it was,
    >the shuttle would launch at 3:57:30pm EDT. It's a
    >little early because the pass to the east is 2 degrees
    >higher (20 degree in SE) than the pass in the west (18
    >degrees in the NW). It also takes time to get to
    >orbit, that is, the shuttle doesn't just start out in
    >orbit. This time of launch would put the shuttle
    >directly into the orbital plane of the ISS, with the
    >ISS on exact backside of the earth from the shuttle at
    >launch.
    >
    >      Is this correct? If it is then there should not
    >be any orbital plane maneuvers, correct?
    >
    >
    >      Regards,
    >          Jeff Umbarger
    >          Plano, TX USA
    >
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