Re: Okean-O Zenit and Okean-O: worth the wait!

Quinster7@aol.com
Tue, 20 Jul 1999 09:40:52 EDT

In a message dated 7/20/99 3:25:51 AM Eastern Daylight Time, 
ecannon@mail.utexas.edu writes:

<< Okean-O Zenit is a very bright (one-power) fast flasher with a 
 period of about 0.5 second!  I first tried clicking with each 
 flash.  That was 20 clicks.  Then I tried to count 30 cycles to 
 the next click.  So that gave me the second timing totaling 50 
 cycles.  Then I started again and tried to count 70 cycles 
 between two clicks.  I estimated .3 error due to it not being 
 easy to be certain that I was counting correctly with it 
 tumbling that rapidly.  These were all done using one-power!
 
 99- 39 B 99-07-20 03:21:27   EC   10.0 0.3  20  0.50  mag +1.5->inv (1x)
 99- 39 B 99-07-20 03:21:43   EC   25.7 0.3  50  0.51  mag +1.5->inv (1x)
 99- 39 B 99-07-20 03:22:55   EC   36.7 0.3  70  0.52  mag +1.5->inv (1x)
 
 Okean-O (25860, 99-39A) and Okean-O Zenit (25861, 99-39B) were
 worth waiting out more than 30-40 minutes of clouds!  Okean-O
 was easily visible at one-power, at least +2.5, maybe +2.0.  
 Is it in its permanent orbit? >>

I agree!  I made it a point to observe this flashing Zenit last night after 
reading a previous post.  I'm sure glad I did.  This is the fastest and 
brightest flasher I have yet seen - appearing more like an airplane than a 
satellite but "strobing" even more often than an airplane would.  My guess at 
the period was below 1 sec (no timing) but I am still surprised it was as 
fast as .5 sec!  My estimating skills are still not that great without 
actually timing.  Flashes were between 0 and 1st magnitude from my location, 
with the Zenit passing from south to north centerred on July 20, 01:45 UTC, 
culminating at 43 deg. in the east.  I realized that Okean-O itself would 
make a similar pass afterwards but did not wait out to observe it because I 
did not think it would be so bright.  I'll have to give it a try soon also.

Quinn McCleery
Raleigh, NC
35.88525N
75.52529W