Consider the moon

Karsten Isenberg (isenberg@gmx.net)
Tue, 13 Jul 1999 19:33:32 -0500

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------7D554B4CDD7820329222583F
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi!

I've got two "problems", I cannot solve:

1.) Every satellite visible prediction software calculates the sun as
the light source of reflecting satellites.
The sun has a magnitude of -27. An iridium flare can reach a magnitude
of -9.
So, it is easy to understand, that the sun provides the light for the
flare.
But, what about the moon. The moon can reach a magnitude of -12.
Why doesn't any prediction software use the moon as a light source for
satellite reflections?
When the moon reflects the light on a satellite, the satellite will be
also visible if the sunlight doesn't reach the satellite directly.

Or what about an iridium flare, that is reflected to another iridium
satellite and then it is visible on a special earth location?


2.) An other thing I think all the time is that when the moon is in the
sky, I cannot see a predicted satellite in the moon's near. The moon
shines to bright. But predictions are made for that area.


--

   - Karsten -


--------------7D554B4CDD7820329222583F
Content-Type: text/x-vcard; charset=us-ascii;
 name="isenberg.vcf"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Description: Card for Karsten Isenberg
Content-Disposition: attachment;
 filename="isenberg.vcf"

begin:vcard 
n:Isenberg;Karsten
x-mozilla-html:FALSE
url:http://linux.rz.fh-hannover.de/~isenberg
adr:;;229 S LEWIS ST #B;STILLWATER;OK;74074-3514;USA
version:2.1
email;internet:isenberg@gmx.net
end:vcard

--------------7D554B4CDD7820329222583F--