Delta/Globalstar Info, 9 Jul 99 launch

Ron Lee (ronlee@pcisys.net)
Thu, 08 Jul 1999 08:29:24 -0600

Globalstar, Delta, 9 Jul 99, 9:01:38 UT
1 99999P 99 0XX A 99190.42362268  .00005000  00000-0  00000-0 0    13
2 99999  51.9830 319.0533 0003960 132.7090 135.6330 12.74000000    13
Globalstar, Delta, 9 Jul 99, 12:01:08 UT
1 99998P 99 0XX A 99190.54862268  .00005000  00000-0  00000-0 0    10
2 99998  51.9830   4.1766 0003960 132.7090 135.6330 12.74000000    12

Two elsets provided..one each for the beginning of the two launch periods.

Each launch window is three minutes long.

I used a different NORAD number for the second launch window this time.

I believe a 35 second error has been introduced such that the satellite will
arrive 35 seconds LATE compared to predictions using these elsets.  Since I
suggest at least a 2-3 minute pad on either side of the prediction for early
revs anyway, I did not adjust the epoch.  If another delay introduces more
error (due to my work), I will correct the error.  In the meantime, look
early and late as well as crosstrack to account for typical errors.

The circularization burn occurs between 3712.5 and 3738.9 seconds after
launch.
This may be visible to some Australian observers.

The upper satellites are deployed 4150 seconds after launch.  That may occur 
while sunlit now.  Australian observers should check this.

Lower satellites are deployed 4400 seconds after launch.

The evasive burn which should be visible to SW USA observers (occurring over
southern Baja CA), occurs between 6500 and 6505 seconds after launch.

The depletion burn occurs between 6950 and 6956.8 seconds after launch.  This
would be good for the region around the Great Lakes (North America) but I
believe those regions are in daylight then.

Ron Lee