update for S&T article, and more

Walter Nissen (dk058@cleveland.freenet.edu)
Mon, 20 Jul 1998 11:47:20 -0400 (EDT)

Back around May 1st, it looked like Mir would make one of those epochal, 
"Biblical" passes over Fort Collins, the kind that have hooked so many 
visual observers, so Dan Laszlo, or S&T, choose that morning to illustrate 
the features of QuickSat, presenting QS output on page 71 of the August 
issue of S&T. 
 
Unfortunately, it now seems the pass of Mir will be merely eye-popping, 
not epochal.  Some non-fanatics may prefer to catch the brighter pass of 
Mir in the evening and trade sleep for the morning passes of the other 
objects. 
 
I have only a very old version of QuickSat, one which meets my needs very 
well.  So I can't quite replicate the QS output which appeared in S&T. 
There are even a few details I had to fudge.  The times of passage, 
altitudes, magnitudes, and other geometrical predictions below are almost 
certainly much more accurate than those printed in S&T.  If you find my 
output confusing, take from it only those most important predicted values 
and let the rest go.  Some kind soul might post an output here from an 
updated version of QS. 
 
Note that the order of appearance of the objects will be different than 
that published months ago, and that the objects will appear at different 
times.  In the original published version, note that QS's "Tim" parameter 
very nicely identified the potential problems.  This is still subject to 
revision as the week progresses, but right now it looks like the time 
differences will be: 
 
EGP       30 seconds later    (visible higher) 
TiPS     199 seconds EARLIER 
OAO 2     10 seconds EARLIER 
OAO 3     24 seconds EARLIER 
Mir     1874 seconds EARLIER  (different part of sky) 
DMSP      34 seconds EARLIER 
 
I should say that I don't recommend using VIT (village idiot time) as in 
this example, finding UTC more accurate and, ultimately, simpler.  Nor the 
deprecated unit "miles", nor the deprecated West longitude.  Actual 
longitude would be -105.050.  Personally, I like West longitude (QS does 
too, I guess), but I feel agreement, and the resulting consistent usage, 
are more important than holding on to obsolete forms.  I would question 
those who would hold on to az/el (which was wrong from its first use 
earlier this Century) or nomenclatures like GMT, Zulu, or keps, if they 
really want to pass these messes onto our children and 
great-grandchildren and their great-grandchildren. 
 
Cheers. 
 
Walter Nissen                   dk058@cleveland.freenet.edu 
-81.8637, 41.3735, 256m elevation 
 
--- 
 
If you are a minute late, you will miss it. 
If you are a minute early, you will see it. 
 
--- 
 
  40.500 105.050 4930.    Fort Collins, CO  <-- 2000  7.0 30 F F F T F 
 
***  1998 July 24  Fri evening  *** Times are PM MDT ***   318 1052 
 
 H  M  S  TIM AL AZI C   U  MAG   REVS  HGT SHD  RNG  EW PHS  R A   DEC 
16609 Mir Complex                     -1.0  -3 
 9 18 36   .2 35 139 C  50 -1.7  103.4  237 110  391 1.9  27 1841  -5.5 
16908 EGP                              3.5  f1 flashes to 4 or 5 
 9 35 55   .0 47   6 C  94  5.9  112.8  927 896 1181  .7 102 1851  82.3 
16908 EGP                              3.5  f1 flashes to 4 or 5 
11 38 50   .0 74  28 C 117  5.0  113.9  925 527  954  .9  73 1939  53.6 
 
***  1998 July 25  Sat morning  *** Times are AM MDT ***   318 1052 
 
 H  M  S  TIM AL AZI C   U  MAG   REVS  HGT SHD  RNG  EW PHS  R A   DEC 
16908 EGP                              3.5  f1 flashes to 4 or 5 
 1 39 10   .0 40 246   131  5.5  114.9  925  35 1279  .7  47 1750  10.3 
23937 TiPS                             5.0  6T 
 3  8 36  2.6 67 309 C  48  5.7  932.1  621 279  666 1.2  71 2025  51.6 
 3597 OAO 2                            5.0  3G2 can flash up to -2 
 3 43 14   .2 42 190 C 103  5.4  141.7  471  53  666 1.4  33 2225  -7.4 
 6153 OAO 3 (Cop)                      4.5   4g0 
 3 43 31   .2 46 178 C  87  4.7  141.0  445  85  591 1.5  43 23 2  -3.6 
16609 Mir Complex                     -1.0  -3 
 3 44  5   .2 47  31 C 120 -1.3  107.6  237  63  314 2.3 112  3 4  66.5 
14506 DMSP 2-2                         4.0  4g2 can flash to 2.5 on zenith 
 3 52 11   .0 37 266 C  39  4.9  128.8  508 127  775  .8  42 1911  19.9 
 
OAO 2            3.0  2.2  0.0  6.3 d 
1 03597U 68110A   98196.62496038 +.00000091 +00000-0 +32817-4 0 00111 
2 03597 034.9977 290.6024 0005252 128.9703 231.1455 14.42423620557929 
Copernicus       3.0  2.2  0.0  6.3 d 
1 06153U 72065A   98196.77012508 +.00000139 +00000-0 +3w702-4 0 01671 
2 06153 035.0095 311.4031 0008206 017.9660 342.1318 14.53288958372857 
DMSP B5D2-2      6.4  1.7  0.0  6.5 v 
1 14506U 83113A   98197.40961026  .00000138  00000-0  78483-4 0   777 
2 14506  98.5697 333.8819 0012496 143.6700 216.5329 14.23995093761186 
Mir Complex     32.7  4.2  0.0  1.6 v 
1 16609U 86017A   98199.55549267  .00009084  00000-0  87649-4 0  640x 
2 16609  51.6601 247.7119 0006596 234.8248 125.2124 15.65774395708971 
EGP              2.2  0.0  0.0  6.7 d 
1 16908U 86061A   98197.13377791 -.00000083 +00000-0 +10000-3 0 03043 
2 16908 050.0078 183.6702 0011195 145.3637 214.7929 12.44419299210900 
TiPS             2.5  0.0  0.0  6.3 d 
1 23937U 96029  F 98138.05883391  .00000650  00000-0  80149-3 0    05 
2 23937  63.4144 125.6140 0059000 356.4353   3.5647 13.64278244    06