Updated 71-110 elements

Ted Molczan (molczan@fox.nstn.ca)
Tue, 21 Jan 1997 19:03:02 -0500

I believe the following are accurate elements of the old experimental 
NOSS triplets:

NOSS 0 (C)       0.3  0.9  2.4  8.0 d
1 05680U 71110  C 97 21.10021435  .00000000  00000-0  10676-5 0    02
2 05680  69.9990 188.0830 0009658 359.8162   0.3000 13.73802227    01

NOSS 0 (D)       0.3  0.9  2.4  8.0 d
1 05681U 71110  D 97 21.06551227  .00000000  00000-0  10687-5 0    07
2 05681  69.9980 188.5200 0009868 357.8628   2.2500 13.73740578    01

NOSS 0 (E)       0.3  0.9  2.4  8.0 d
1 05682U 71110  E 97 21.09928333  .00000000  00000-0  10733-5 0    09
2 05682  69.9980 192.0600 0010040   0.6563 359.4600 13.73484657    02

The new elements of the C object compare favourably with those recently
derived by Greg Roberts and Raoul Behrend, based on the object's Doppler 
shifted 137.08 MHz radio transmissions:

NOSS 0 (C)       0.3  0.9  2.4  8.0 d
1 05680U 71110  C 96359.13289350  .00000026  00000-0  27760-4 0    09
2 05680  70.0000 246.2020 0000001   0.0000 317.7030 13.73819268    04

Since the radio frequency of 71110C has long been known, I am confident
of that identification. I am less confident in the D and E identifications.

There is also an A object, for which I do not have current elements.
Twenty years ago, they were in the order C,D,E and A, based on decreasing
mean-motion. C,D, and E were close in mean-motion. I am not certain that 
the one I am calling E is not in fact A, because its mean-motion seems
too low, more like I would expect of A.

I recommend nothing smaller than 11x80 binoculars to observe these objects.
I received these new elements from one of my correspondents. 

Clear skies!
Ted