Re: Mystery object

Jacob Nevins (jacob@spuddy.mew.co.uk)
Sun, 14 Jan 96 11:05:49 GMT

On 8 Jan Bjorn Gimle <bjorn@tt-tech.se> wrote: 

 j>> Out of curiosity, does anyone archive old elsets?

    [snip]
 b> seds.lpl.arizona.edu and kilroy.jpl.nasa.gov
    [snip]

Thanks for this info; also thanks to other folks who mailed me 
with similar information.

 j>> Time:  2000-2100 BST (1900-2000 GMT)

 b> According to my program, the Sun didn't set until 2017 GMT !!
  > (In direction 303 degrees)

Indeed - however from where I am a large hill obscures between 
ten and twenty degrees of sky in the west. Thus I couldn't 
actually see the Sun; however the sky was still quite bright.  
When I say 1900-2000 GMT I mean it could have occurred at any 
time during that period but I didn't think to note the exact 
time.

 b> The only real candidate is SeaSat 1...

Thanks for that - I imagine that satellites as bright as -4 or 
so are very rare, and it may have been a little fainter - but 
you can imagine the sky brightness when the Sun was still above 
the horizon.

 b> I'll try to get some ideas from launch/decay info, and let 
  > SkyMap search my elset(s) for more candidates.

OK, thanks very much for your time.

On 9 Jan Jim Meadows <jim.meadows@the-matrix.com> wrote:

 j> I'll hazard the guess that it was no satellite at all.

What else could it have been? A weather balloon, or one of the 
other usual candidates? It certainly wasn't a planet or anything 
like that - it was moving too fast.

Regards - Jacob
<jacob@spuddy.mew.co.uk>
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