92-36B (22007)

Mike McCants (mike@comshare.com)
Tue, 9 Jan 1996 09:48:40 -0600

I have added 4 observations to the list and sorted them:

                                 tot   acc cyc
yy-nnnaa yy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss.t nam sss.t s.t nnn ss.tht remarks
92- 36 B 95-12-29 01:57      PM                 2.41
92- 36 B 96-01-04 01:00      MM   46.8 0.3  20  2.340 4.5-7
92- 36 B 96-01-05 01:19      PM  124.6 0.5  53  2.351
92- 36 B 96-01-05 01:27      MM  131.8 0.3  56  2.354 4.5-inv
92- 36 B 96-01-05 17:15:26   RK   21.0 0.2   9  2.336
92- 36 B 96-01-05 18:59:51   RK   82.1 0.2  35  2.346
92- 36 B 96-01-07 18:06      KJ  271.3 0.3 116  2.338
92- 36 B 96-01-08 00:57      MM  133.7 0.2  57  2.346 4-inv
92- 36 B 96-01-08 16:44:14   RK   58.5 0.2  25  2.342
92- 36 B 96-01-09 01:22      MM  155.1 0.2  66  2.350 4-inv
92- 36 B 96-01-09 01:23      PM  126.1 0.5  53  2.379
92- 36 B 96-01-09 12:20      PM   70.4 0.3  30  2.346

On a zenith pass, 92-36B would be moving at an angular rate of
0.4 degrees/second.  This would be 0.9 degrees per 2.35 seconds.
The ratio of 0.9 degrees to 180 degrees is 0.005.

Thus the synodic effect could be up to 0.005 times 2.35 = 0.012 seconds.

Since the size of the synodic effect depends on the location of the
rotation axis and the sun-satellite-observer geometry, it is generally
less than the maximum.  But it is certainly possible that some of the
scatter in the observations is due to a different value for the synodic
effect for the different passes.

----

92-12B (21903) is also pretty in my evening sky with a period of 4.13
seconds that is gradually increasing.

95-32B (23604) is up to 10.2 seconds.

Mike McCants
mike@comshare.com