Re: Obs 15 February

From: Ed Cannon (ecannon@mail.utexas.edu)
Date: Tue Feb 15 2000 - 23:17:26 PST

  • Next message: Tony Beresford: "OCS elements by Pierre Neirinck"

    Don Gardner (Mir16609@aol.com) wrote:
    
    ] Iridium 85 made an interesting pass.  It was visible at 1x for most 
    ] of the pass - about a +3.5 mag.  The pass produced several bright 
    ] flashes ....   The flashes were not in a repeating pattern nor were 
    ] they grouped into sets.   It traveled S->N in the east....  Strange 
    ] pass, even for an Iridium.
    
    Indeed!  It has made very similar passes, in every way, here also the
    last two nights.  Its brightest flashes are VERY bright.  It's been
    one-power for much of both passes, perhaps at least partly because its 
    orbital height is only 480 km (300 miles).
     
    ] ETS-6 (23230, 94056A) .... 
    ] TDF-1 (19621, 88098A) ....
    
    I got a few clicks on each of these last night, but it was partly cloudy 
    here and I was observing one-power only from UT Austin campus -- plus I 
    looked a little too late and only saw two of the first set of ETS 6
    flashes.  The rapidly moving sort of cirro-cumulus clouds allowed me 
    to see only three TDF 1 flashes.
    
    ISS (25544, 98-67A), though in twilight and low in the partly cloudy 
    sky, was at least as bright as Procyon (alpha Canis Minoris).  
    Globalstar 49 Rk (25965, 99-62E) was tumbling slowly, but the maxima 
    were pretty bright at a range was about 525 km.  HST (20580, 90-37B) 
    was low in the south at a range of about 1200 km (750 miles) but was 
    easy to see anyway.  (It was fainter the night before on a better
    pass.)  
    SERT 2 (04327, 70-9A) flared slowly to about +2 as usual.  Also easily 
    saw good old Resurs O1-3 Rk (23343, 94-74B) on a pass low in the east.  
    OCS (26062, 99-4B) seemed to be about +3.5 on a pass high in the west 
    at a range of about 750 km.  Hoped for but didn't see a NOAA 15 flare.
    
    Not bad for a one-power only, partly cloudy, gibbous-moon-near-zenith, 
    very-bad-lights-on-campus night!  Campus: 30.386N, 97.739W, 150m.
    
    Ed Cannon - ecannon@mail.utexas.edu - Austin, Texas, USA
    
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    Unsubscribe from SeeSat-L by sending a message with 'unsubscribe'
    in the SUBJECT to SeeSat-L-request@lists.satellite.eu.org
    http://www2.satellite.eu.org/seesat/seesatindex.html
    



    This archive was generated by hypermail 2b29 : Tue Feb 15 2000 - 23:19:13 PST