Re: Beginners Question

Leo Barhorst (leobarhorst@pi.net)
Mon, 10 Feb 1997 22:44:01 +0100

jbarker@arinc.com wrote:
> 
>      Good question.  (And one that's hard to research before going online.)
> 
>      The number 20625 is the satellite number assigned by the United States
>      Space Command to enter an object in its Space Catalog.  The numbers
>      are assigned sequentially for each object placed into orbit.
>      Sometimes the number is followed by a "U" indicating that the
>      accompanying orbital parameters (TLE) are unclassified.
> 
>      The other way to reference a particular satellite is by it's
>      International Designator assigned by the UN when the launch is
>      registered.  The International Designator for USSPACECOM #20625 is:
> 
>      COSMOS 2082 R/B
>      1 20625U 90046B   96181.59049082 -.00000322  00000-0 -14525-3 0  9906
>      2 20625  70.9948  11.3358 0016522 218.0791 141.9150 14.13693466315192
> 
>      The first two numbers of the International Designator "90046B"
>      indicate the year of the launch and 046 indicates the 46th space
>      launch registered in 1990.  90046A was the COSMOS 2082 satellite.
>      COSMOS 2082 R/B refers to the rocket body that put COSMOS 2082 into
>      orbit.
> 
>      Below is an example of three satellites being placed into orbit by
>      one rocket.  Note that the USSPACECOM number increments by +1 and the
>      UN International designator uses 90045 followed by an "A", "B", and
>      "C" to designate each of the satellites.
>      Glonass 44
>      1 20619U 90045A   96025.01722855 -.00000060  00000-0  10000-3 0  2655
>      2 20619  65.2318 328.8856 0026577 204.6094 155.2712  2.13102382 44235
>      Glonass 45
>      1 20620U 90045B   96024.19738023 -.00000057  00000-0  10000-3 0  2633
>      2 20620  65.2231 328.9090 0007967  44.8202 315.2510  2.13102480 44254
>      Glonass 46
>      1 20621U 90045C   96022.85682061 -.00000055  00000-0  10000-3 0  8527
>      2 20621  65.2462 329.0101 0012859 198.5265 161.4392  2.13101743 44225
> 
>      Most TLE lists show both the USSPACECOM number and the International
>      Designator along with the name, but that is not true of all.  Off
>      hand, I do not know of an available database that cross references the
>      two other than by looking at a complete TLE list that shows both.
>      Maybe someone else in SEESAT knows of such a database.
> 
>      Jeff Barker
>      Leavenworth, Kansas     Lat: 35N
>                              Long: 95W
> 
> 
> ______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________
> Subject: Beginners Question
> Author:  "Michael Riches" <mikey@dove.mtx.net.au> at SMTPGATE
> Date:    2/9/97 7:50 AM
> 
> 
> Hi there.
> 
> Being new to this list I have a short question
> 
> I have found a site that gives me predictions for visual satellites I may
> observe from my location in Adelaide, South Australia.  But it identifies
> the satellites by a number, eg #20625.
> 
> Could someone tell me what this number is, and if there is a site or
> software that will detail what the corresponding satellite is and its
> function.
> 
> Thanks for your time.
> 
> Regards
> 
> Michael Riches
> Hello Michael and Jeff,

I do have a databasefile that contains all the NORAD and COSPAR numbers
and even more info on the launch such as satname, launchdate, lifetime 
and decaydate (if apropiate).
It is a MSWorksfile of more than 2.2 MB and has now almost 24800 
entries.
If you are interested let me know and I'll see how to get you a copy, 
best on disk in some zipped file.

Regulary the file is updated with the new launches and decays.

-- 
Greetings and clear skies

Leo Barhorst		Alkmaar			The Netherlands
52.65 North		4.767 East		1 m ASL
Member of Seesat-L
------------------------------------------------------------
Every day I wonder about the things I see in the (night)sky