Payload D (?); Intelsat 512; re: missing numbers

From: Ed Cannon (ecannon@mail.utexas.edu)
Date: Sat Dec 28 2002 - 05:22:23 EST

  • Next message: Phillip Clark: "Re: Missing numbers"

    On Dec. 25 UTC I had a prediction for and seem to have 
    observed "Payload D" (27608, 02-058D).  It was tumbling 
    and flashing, including one flash of at least +1 if not 
    brighter at about 1:14:02 (from San Antonio, Texas, 
    29.40N, 98.66W, 200m).  I wonder about its true identity, 
    as my understanding is that most of the payloads on that 
    launch were microsatellites.  Here are two elsets, the 
    one for that night and a more recent one:
    
    PAYLOAD D                                        667 x 636
    1 27608U 02058D   02357.55206756  .00002169  00000-0  35645-3 0    86
    2 27608  64.5615  10.3438 0022440 134.5032 225.7908 14.72948985   427
    Payload D (Saudisat 2?)                          668 x 636 km
    1 27608U 02058D   02361.55783605  .00001644  00000-0  27529-3 0   117
    2 27608  64.5605 358.1534 0022435 132.4793 227.8209 14.72961730  1017
    
    A while ago I observed Intelsat 512 (85-087A, 16101) from 
    about 7:14:44.7 until 7:26:51.5, with a 128.27-second gap 
    around the phase shift, when it was too faint for my 10x50
    binocs.  This was from right outside my apartment (30.309N,
    97.728W, 150m), which is very light-polluted, so I did not 
    try to see it without binoculars, although the brightest 
    flashes might have been bright enough, at least under 
    somewhat better circumstances.  (A while before that, I
    saw Superbird A from San Antonio, about 147 km from my
    apartment in Austin.  I wonder how often satellites are 
    observed by one person from two cities in one night....)
    
    On the missing numbers 27406 and 27407, a while back Antonin
    Vitek suggested that they might have been reserved for other
    pieces from the Intelsat 903 launch (27403, 27404, 02-016A
    and B):
    
    http://satobs.org/seesat/Apr-2002/0004.html
    
    I've heard that sometimes some highly eccentric objects 
    as those may be (if they are indeed up there) are somewhat 
    tricky for SCC to track.  
    
    Object 27405 was later identified as something else:
    
    Internatnl
    Designator   CatNo Common Name               Source LaunchDate
    ------------ ----- ------------------------- ------ ----------
    1990-065W    27405 CRRES DEB (CANISTER)      US     1990/07/25
    
    That's from http://satobs.org/seesat/Apr-2002/0241.html .
    
    Ed Cannon - ecannon@mail.utexas.edu - Austin, Texas, USA
    
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