Re: Observing Report: 4 Geosynchronous Satellites in the Same Field of View!

From: Bjoern Gimle@GlocalNet (Gimle@GlocalNet)
Date: Thu Aug 21 2008 - 17:10:18 UTC

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    Generally, giving both position AND time (to the nearest minute)
    allows a more definitive identification.
    The time (and direction) in which it passes the FOV helps.
    Of course for a true geostationary it is 240 s/degree FOV
    and in equatorial (decl) direction.
    
    /Björn
    ----- Original Message ----- 
    From: <Skywayinc@aol.com>
    To: <seesat-l@satobs.org>
    Sent: Thursday, August 21, 2008 3:56 PM
    Subject: Observing Report: 4 Geosynchronous Satellites in the Same Field of 
    View!
    
    
    Thought some on this list might be interested in this observation.
    Ron is a member of the Amateur Observers' Society (AOS) of
    New York.  He and two other AOS members made this interesting
    observation on Wednesday evening from Robert Moses State
    Park, located in Suffolk County, Long Island, NY.  Anybody want  to
    take a crack at identifying what these guys saw?
    
    -- joe rao
    
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Hi everyone,
    
    A few weeks ago I posted how I saw a geosynchronous  satellite drift
    out from M11. Well, tonight at Robert moses, I was looking  at M11
    again. And wouldn't you know it, this time I see TWO satellites
    slowly drifting across the face of M11. But wait, it turned out there
    were a total of 4! It was very interesting to see this many clustered
    together. They were not equally spaced from one another, nor were
    they  in a straight line or any apparent pattern. Bill Bradley pulled
    out an  application on his PDA and gave an estimated location of an
    altitude 41.7º,  and an azimuth of approx 200º.
    
    Rich Huber, Bill Bradley, and I took turns  watching these dots remain
    stationary among the drifting backdrop of stars  passing by while
    contemplating the purpose of why these satellites were  clustered
    together. I would estimate them to have been grouped within 20 arc
    minutes.
    
    Cool stuff!
    
    Ron Lindenfeld
    _torbin@optonline.net_ (mailto:torbin@optonline.net)
    
    
    
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