Re: TJM obs of 2005 Aug 02 UTC

From: Ed Cannon (ecannon@mail.utexas.edu)
Date: Tue Aug 02 2005 - 03:48:44 EDT

  • Next message: Russell Eberst: "2005AUG1.OBS"

    Ted wrote:
    
    >On Aug 02 at 03:36 UTC, -6 min / +10 min, I looked for 
    >Ed Cannon's UNID of 2005 Jul 02, near the following orbit, 
    >but did not see it: 
    >
    >1 31697U 05697A   05211.06255680  .00000324  00000-0  29078-2 0    15
    >2 31697  27.5419 185.4013 6847259 147.3464 284.7073  2.65133865   389
    
    Imagine my chagrin when I didn't see it there either!  
    Weather conditions here weren't very good, so I wasn't
    sure what to think, but Ted's negative observation 
    confirms that it wasn't there to see.  
    
    I also didn't see it at predictions for mean motion equal 
    to 2.29.  
    
    However, I also had later predictions for mean motion equal 
    to 2.58 (36 revs) -- not very easy, in the west.  In spite 
    of that and the weather I went back to the Ney Museum 
    (30.307N, 97.727W, 150m) to try again.  In that part of the 
    sky I could see stars to about +6.5, and (Hopefully this is 
    not wishful thinking!) I thought that I saw an eastbound 
    object for several seconds and clicked very near the 
    following position (could be a false alarm):
    
    2005-08-02 05:37:44.7 -- RA 16:40.8, Dec. +12.4 (epoch 2000)
    
    Here are the two MM=2.58 elsets for which I had predictions:
    
    Ed050730 36 RMS=0.33 MM=2.57969620               31248 x 910 km
    1 39690U 05697A   05211.07454544  .00000320  00000-0  18416-1 0    15
    2 39690  27.5812 186.6520 6754611 139.1769 298.6535  2.57969620   371
    Unk050702 2.58
    1 89985U          05210.98940398  .00000311  00000-0  39425-2 0    06
    2 89985  27.5425 185.6488 6884554 146.2772 218.9054  2.57968809    04
    
    With this unknown, I've certainly learned about the slippery 
    nature of geosynchronous transfer orbits, in terms of trying 
    to determine the elements from repeated similar observations.  
    I very much appreciate the efforts of the at least two orbital 
    analysts who've been helping to try to see it again and nail 
    it down.
    
    STS-114.  Sure hope the weather cooperates here for the 
    passes in the last mornings of the mission.  I also really
    hope that they don't pull on those gapfillers -- at least
    not very hard.
    
    Ed Cannon - ecannon@mail.utexas.edu - Austin, Texas, USA
    
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