Re: Russian Space Program Hurt by Money Shortage

Steve Walter (sowalter@erols.com)
Mon, 4 Aug 1997 04:33:53 -0400

In the vein of "[Governments] that live in glass houses shouldn't be
throwing stones ...", I heard/read several years ago that (some?) U.S.
Military satellites follow this same procedure of blowing off international
standards and instead getting as much on-orbit life as possible.

I came across this information while working on de-orbit plans for TDRS-1
(when its time comes), but I can no longer document the material/cite
references.

Jay -- let me again thank you for this information-service you've been
providing!  It's VERY much appreciated!

Steve Walter

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
| Email:  sowalter@erols.com  or  swalter@cscmail.csc.com
|                             or  Stephen.O.Walter.1@gsfc.nasa.gov
|            [~-76d 49.6m Longitude   x   +39d 01.3m Latitude]
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =





>
>How long until one of those dead sats collides and destroys some working
>sync sat?
>
>--------------------------------
>
>     ...
>
>     In the civilian realm, the Russians have stopped maneuvering their
>     communication satellites out of geosynchronous orbits as they near
>     the end of their useful life, a standard practice to reduce the
>     problem of space junk. Now they push the satellites to the limit
>     and allow them to die in orbit.
>
>     _________________________________________________________________
>
>
>
>Jay Respler