Re: Morning Pass Of ISS/Venus

From: Bjoern Gimle (b_gimle@algonet.se)
Date: Fri Apr 27 2001 - 13:07:40 PDT

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    Knowing exactly where to look is the key, just like for Iridiums.
    Once I saw Venus one morning walking from the train to work, with the Moon
    as reference, and could locate it after sunrise later.
    
    -- bjorn.gimle@tietotech.se (office)                         --
    -- b_gimle@algonet.se (home)  http://www.algonet.se/~b_gimle --
    -- COSPAR 5919, MALMA,    59.2576 N, 18.6172 E, 23 m         --
    -- COSPAR 5918, HAMMARBY, 59.2985 N, 18.1045 E, 44 m         --
    
    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Allen Thomson" <thomsona@flash.net>
    To: "Tom Wagner" <sciteach1950@home.com>; "SeeSat"
    <SeeSat-L@blackadder.lmsal.com>
    Sent: Friday, April 27, 2001 9:41 PM
    Subject: Re: Morning Pass Of ISS/Venus
    
    
    >
    > Tom Wagner said
    >
    >
    > > To see Venus with the unaided eye in a blue sky you need to use foveal
    > > vision. Your foveal (central) vision is a 1 degree across. Therefore,
    > > finding Venus in daylight is like trying to find a white speck against a
    > sky
    > > full of floaters and whitish blobs (blood cells against your retina at
    the
    > > moment) all the while looking through a soda straw from Burger King.
    :~o
    > > It's about impossible to find it for the first time unless you first
    know
    > > about where to look and spot it with binocs or a tele.
    >
    > (Hopefully this isn't too much off charter, now that another Venus-bright
    > satellite is up there.)
    >
    > What you say is generally true -- I've seen Venus in the day sky a fair
    > number of times, but always by sighting along a telescope pointing at it.
    > Except once, in El Paso, when we were watching an air show over Ft. Bliss
    > from the terrace of a friend's house on the eastern side of the Franklin
    > Mountains.  We were in the shade (it was early/mid afternoon)  and the sky
    > was an unusually deep blue.  A few days before, I'd tried to find Venus in
    > the daytime sky and failed, but glancing up then, by gosh, there it was
    not
    > far from the zenith, quite plain to see.  I pointed it out to the others
    > there, and everyone saw it without much trouble.
    >
    >
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    >
    
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