SuperBird A for Australia,

ROB MATSON (ROBERT.D.MATSON@cpmx.saic.com)
8 Apr 1997 14:55:36 -0800

Hi Anthony,

Yes -- if my model is correct, Superbird A should now be flashing for viewers
in Australia -- western Australia.  It's probably too close to twilight (yet)
for Aussies west of longitude 140-degrees east, but Rob McNaught in Bugaldie
should be in fine shape, as should Vince Gardiner in Coffs Harbour.  For Rob
and Vince, I calculate a peak flash time of about 9:06 UTC for April 9. From
Rob's location, Superbird A will be at about azimuth 64, elevation 20.5:  6
degrees to the right of beta-Leonis, and about 11 degrees to the lower right
of Mars.  The sun is 16 degrees below the horizon.  I'm sorry, Tony, that I
don't have your coordinates anywhere handy -- if memory serves, you're near
Rob?

Since these predicted flashes are at a very different point in Superbird A's
rotation cone from the U.S. flashes, I don't have a lot of confidence in the
exact time. In other words:  start looking early!  Once someone "down under"
has picked up the flashes, I'll REALLY be able to improve on the rotation
axis.

And stay tuned.  My program is telling me that a second flash window has
opened up for U.S. observers.  I'll post prediction times later today.  For
now, my best estimates for Australia, New Zealand, and some south Pacific
islands are:

April 9 (UT)

9:04 UTC  Arc from Adelaide thru Broken Hill up to Cairns.

9:05  Arc from Warrnambool thru the middle of New South Wales up to
Rockhampton

9:06  Melbourne to Wagga Wagga to Bundaberg

9:06:30  Northwest tip of Tasmania; entire east coast of New South Wales: 
Canberra, Wollongong, Sydney, Newcastle, Coffs Harbour, Ballina; southeast
coast fo Queensland:  Southport, Ipswich, Brisbane.

9:11  New Caledonia

9:13:30-9:16  South Island of New Zealand

9:15 - 9:17:30  North Island of New Zealand

9:18  Fiji

9:24  Western Samoa